Quiz ! About shikona changes…

As we previously mentioned it, Shodai decided to keep his shikona following his promotion to the ozeki rank. Let’s try to figure out how much we know about rikishi’s shikona, shikona changes and real names…

As usual, try your best to get your kashi koshi!

1. Let’s start this quiz quietly. Ama became ozeki…

a. Goeido

b. Kakuryu

c. Harumafuji

d. Baruto

2. Which one of these wrestlers is currently fighting with his real name ?

a. Takarafuji

b. Takayasu

c. Takanosho

d. Takagenji

3. Who started wrestling using his real name – Fukuoka ?

a. Hokutofuji

b. Okinoumi

c. Ryuden

d. Daieisho

4. Who is the other Mr. Fukuoka in makuuchi ?

a. Abi

b. Terutsuyoshi

c. Meisei

d. Enho

5. Who started his sumo career with the shikona Wakamisho ?

a. Kiribayama

b. Tamawashi

c. Ichinojo

d. Terunofuji

6. The Bulgarian wrestler Aoiyama was given his current shikona after being asked a few questions about things he likes. What does “Aoiyama” mean ?

a. Red wind

b. Red mountain

c. Blue wind

d. Blue mountain

7. And by the way, Big Dan’s (Aoiyama) real name is…

a. Petkov

b. Dimitrov

c. Kotov

d. Ivanov

Big Dan: Aoiyama Kosuke.

8. Let’s now have some fun (and a few headaches !) with Sadogatake’s wrestlers. Who used to be called Kotokikutsugi ?

a. Kotoosho

b. Kotoeko

c. Kotoyuki

d. Kotoshogiku

9. Kotokamatani, on the other hand, is now known as…

a. Kotonowaka

b. Kotoeko

c. Kotoshoho

d. Kotoshogiku

10. Whereas Kotoenomoto has become…

a. Kotooshu

b. Kotoeko

c. Kotoshoho

d. Kotoyuki

11. And finally, Kototebakari is currently known as…

a. Kotoshoho

b. Kotoyuki

c. Kotonowaka

d. Kotoshogiku

12. Takanohana and Wakanohana are one of sumo’s most famous brothers. Their real name is :

a. Hanada

b. Koga

c. Sawai

d. Hagiwara

A sumo legend: former yokozuna Takanohana.

13. Which one of these rikishi used to be called “Sato” and changed his shikona as he got promoted to makuuchi ?

a. Takakeisho

b. Asanoyama

c. Mitakeumi

d. Shodai

14. Hanakaze is known for his incredibly long career, which started back in 1986 (!). Under how many names has he wrestled so far ?

a. One

b. Two

c. Three

d. Four

15. And finally, the great Hakuho has changed shikona :

a. Once

b. Twice

c. Thrice

d. He never changed his shikona

The answers :

1. Let’s start this quiz quietly. Ama became ozeki…

c. Harumafuji. Of course ! He took that name after his promotion to ozeki, following the Kyushu basho 2008.

Nine time grand champion: former yokozuna Harumafuji.

2. Which one of these wrestlers is currently fighting with his real name ?

b. Takayasu Akira.

3. Who started wrestling using his real name – Fukuoka ?

b. Okinoumi. He actually semmed to have some remorses after changing his shikona to Okinoumi, in March 2009. Two basho after, he went back to Fukuoka Ayumi, during just one basho. He then changed once again – for good – to Okinoumi Ayumi.

4. Who is the other Mr. Fukuoka in makuuchi ?

b. Terutsuyoshi. He has used only one shikona so far : Terutsuyoshi Shoki.

Terutsuyoshi Shoki, also known as Fukuoka Shoki.

5. Who started his sumo career with the shikona Wakamisho ?

d. Terunofuji. Terunofuji likes changes : he used to be called Wakamisho Yoshiaki, then Wakamisho Noriaki, then Wakamisho Yoshiaki again, then Terunofuji Yoshiaki, then Terunofuji Haruo.

6. The Bulgarian wrestler Aoiyama was given his current shikona after being asked a few questions about things he likes. What does “Aoiyama” mean ?

d. Blue mountain. Aoiyama likes blue color, and prefers mountain over sea.

7. And by the way, Big Dan’s (Aoiyama) real name is…

d. Ivanov. Daniel Ivanov, to be exact.

8. Let’s now have some fun (and a few headaches !) with Sadogatake’s wrestlers. Who used to be called Kotokikutsugi ?

d. Kotoshogiku. His real name is Kikutsugi Kazuhiro.

9. Kotokamatani, on the other hand, is now known as…

a. Kotonowaka. Outside the dohyo, he’s Kamatani Masakatsu

10. Whereas Kotoenomoto has become…

d. Kotoyuki, also known as Enomoto Yuki.

11. And finally, Kototebakari is currently known as…

a. Kotoshoho. His real name : Tebakari Toshiki

12. Takanohana and Wakanohana are one of sumo’s most famous brothers. Their real name is :

a. Hanada. Koga is Kaio’s name ; Sawai is Goeido’s name and Hagiwara is former Kisenosato’s name. Some great wrestlers down there.

13. Which one of these rikishi used to be called “Sato” and changed his shikona as he got promoted to makuuchi ?

a. Takakeisho. Asanoyama did change his shikona, but after promotion to juryo. Mitakeumi took just one shikona, whereas Shodai is fighting under his actual name.

14. Hanakaze is known for his incredibly long career, which started back in 1986 (!). Under how many names has he wrestled so far ?

c. Three. He started fighting under his real name, Yamagushi Daisaku, then switched to Tatsuyamagushi Daisaku, and to Hanakaze Daisaku. He holds that name since July 1999 !

15. And finally, the great Hakuho has changed shikona :

d. He never changed his shikona. Hakuho Sho. That’s the GOAT’s shikona.

Simply the best: yokozuna Hakuho Sho.

 

Hanakaze’s Career in Context

Hiya. I was just playing around with some historical data and I created this little visual representation of Hanakaze’s sumo career. I’ve always been amazed at his longevity. Born in 1970, he joined the sumo world in 1986. These were the heady days of audio mix-tapes, featuring the Bangle’s “Walk Like An Egyptian” and such VHS classics as Jane Fonda’s “Low Impact Aerobic Workout.”

In a sumo context, he saw the end of the Chiyonofuji reign and rise of Takanohana and Akebono. He’s outlasted Asashoryu, Harumafuji, and Goeido. Feel free to play with the list of wrestlers, add your own favorites…maybe Abi or Terunofuji. Since the careers of the Yokozuna top out at the same place, it can be hard to make them out, so click on the names in the legend to highlight them one at a time.

Kyushu 2019, Day 8, Bouts From The Lower Divisions

It’s nakabi, the middle day, which means more rikishi who may get a 4-0 kachi-koshi, or a 0-4 make-koshi.

Unfortunately, it’s also a Sunday, which means most of my usual sources are low on content. So this post is going to be somewhat shorter than you’re used to.

Continue reading

Jonokuchi Report, Match Day 1

Jonokuchi is the lowest division in sumo. Unless you are successful at the amateur or college level, thereby earning a privileged debut in Sandanme or Makushita, you begin your career here after a short maezumo assessment. For most, especially for those who become sekitori, Jonokuchi is an introductory tournament or two, while the real education begins in Jonidan and Sandanme. It’s the first time you see your name in lights (well, ink) on the banzuke. And it’s also the first time to see whether you can last a tournament, seven bouts over a fortnight.

Sawaisamu Career chart

Many cannot last long and fall off the banzuke and leave the sport (and the heya life) fairly quickly. Some linger in the division for years, like Hattorizakura, or jump back and forth between Jonokuchi and Jonidan like Sawaisamu. Ultimately, in the search for the next one, the search must start in this division where Hakuho, Kakuryu, Kisenosato, and Harumafuji all began their careers. As we close out 2019, let’s take a look at who is in Jonokuchi.

Jonokuchi Height Distribution

This November, there are fifty-nine wrestlers in the division. Seven did not compete in the first two days, kyujo. Of those who did compete, one, Moriurara, actually started his tournament with a visit to Jonidan. There’s a wide range in ages, heights, and weights, though there’s definitely a cluster of young and relatively thin wrestlers.

Jonokuchi Weight Distribution

The tallest, Okuniashi, is 188 cm while two wrestlers tied for shortest at 165 cm (both won their first bout). The largest wrestler is Daigonishiki, 188kg while the slightest was Nangu at 67kg. Nangu had a really nice uwatenage on Day 1. Using body-mass index, Hattorizakura has the lowest BMI at 21.6, dwarfed by Daigonishiki’s 60.72.

BMI by Hatsubasho and by Age:
Red means Win, Green means Loss

Now that the First match-day is over for these chaps, we get an interesting look at how the cluster of young upstarts had quite a bit of success at the expense of larger, older wrestlers. Senho, one of Hakuho’s protégés whom Herouth has been following since his debut, is one of the red marks on the far right. He just started this year. Though he is tall, his BMI of 28.34 puts him well below that trend line. He has time to bulk up and “skill up.” Hanakaze is at the extreme left end of this scale, as he’s nearly fifty years old, started his sumo career in 1986…but he still picked up a win. If his love for sumo holds up, he should be able to bounce back into Jonidan.