Short Jungyo Newsreel – October 12th


🌐 Location: Ichinomiya

Once again there is barely anything to be found in any media newssites, so my apologies for the meager portion of the day:

Kisenosato trains with Shodai

Takes Shodai for an 11-bout san-ban. Wins all of them. Here is an easy one:

Here is one that’s blurry, but the bout is a little more interesting:

Musubi results

With Harumafuji not participating, the musubi is Kakuryu-Kisenosato each and every day.

Yesterday Kakuryu won.

The following video is from Nagoya TV. It’s a summary of today’s Jungyo day, including some wanpaku keiko (sekitori playing around with kids), Shokkiri, Yokozuna dohyo-iri, and finally, today’s Musubi. Kisenosato wins, but still one-handed.

Jungyo Newsreel – October 7th


🌐 Location: Saitama

Kakuryu keeps his foot on the accelerator

The recovering Yokozuna engaged Shodai in san-ban to the tune of 10 wins, 0 losses.

surprised-kakuryu

Kakuryu entertained the audience with a variety of techniques, including his specialty morozashi and various dashinage.

“I keep testing my foot’s responsiveness as I go. I aim to increase the number of bouts gradually, as my body re-habituates”. He is a bit unhappy with the fact that his skin turns red very quickly after practice. “You can tell a rikishi who regularly practices from one who doesn’t by the way the skin reddens quickly”.

Be that as it may, he did pretty well in the musubi of the day:

Another angle:

Kisenosato skips keiko to do a dohyo-iri at a local shrine

Because of the rain, the ceremony, which, when performed in a shrine, usually takes place in its yard, was done under the eaves in front of the main hall.

kisenosato-under-eaves

This was his first of two dohyo-iri of the day, as he had to return to the venue in time for the basho and perform one there as well.

Later, before the above bout with Kakuryu, he was spotted massaging his left upper arm again. So skipping keiko may have been intentional.

Endo withdraws from Jungyo

The old ankle troubles have reasserted themselves, and he will need three weeks of rest to get it fully healed.

Unconfirmed tweet also mentioned Ikioi as absent (did not participate in the Makuuchi dohyo iri nor in the torikumi).

Harumafuji still not doing torikumi, only dohyo-iri.

Nagoya Day 11 Highlights


Mitakeumi Kensho Stack

Tachiai Is Not Spoiler Free.

A word to our readers. We dearly appreciate all of you, and are grateful that you take the time to come by and visit our little sumo site. A special thanks to all of you who take the time to add your voice to the community here, and post your comments on our stories. As happens from time to time, we get people who are disappointed that we are reporting facts about the day’s sumo events prior to their chance to watch it either on Youtube or HNK. For that, we are somewhat sorry, but let me explain our policy.

Sumo fans in the west are at a huge time disadvantage. By the time the early birds rise in the US East Coast morning hours, matches have been over for hours, and the results are known to everyone who follows sumo across the world – except for the Americas. We made a decision that we would write and comment about the events that happen in Japan from a Japanese time reference. So for Tachiai, there is no such thing as a spoiler. We know that some of our readers are fairly hard core (as we are) and sometimes stay up overnight to watch the matches as they happen. If we waited until Noon or 1:00 PM Eastern, we are just a few hours away from the next day’s matches starting. Very silly. In addition, some of our contributors are fortunate enough to be at the venue and watch the action live. It would make no sense to limit their ability to contribute and report.

So for now and the foreseeable future, Tachiai is an “as it happens” venue. If you want to savor the anticipation of not knowing the outcome until you see it on video, we ask that you refrain from the temptation to check our site, or follow us on Twitter or Facebook. Because we will post major events more or less as they happen. In the instance of twitter, I follow several dozen sumo fans in Japan, and they are tweeting like mad about the matches as they happen, so the entirety of the day, and everyone’s reactions to them bouts is known as I prepare to write.

Again, thank you everyone who reads the site and visits us, we really do treasure you, but we are going to follow sumo action during a basho as closely as our sleep schedule allows.

Highlight Matches

Takekaze defeats Kotoyuki – With Kotoyuki’s make-koshi confirmed, we can assume he will be relegated back to Juryo, short of some divine intervention. Takekaze inches closer to yet another winning record and remaining in Makuuchi.

Okinoumi defeats Gagamaru – Bloody lethargic match was closer to a pair of tired grizzly bears fighting for a sleeping bag than any kind of sumo. Gagamaru has always be sort of low energy “win by being huge” sort of rikishi, but given the speed and energy of the young ones, he looks tremendously out of place. Back to Juryo with him as well.

Nishikigi defeats Aoiyama – Nishikigi will not surrender to the specter of a return to Juryo. Today he was able to best Aoiyama, who has been on a tear this basho. First the shimpan had to talk it over, but they upheld the gyoji’s gumbai. Given Aoiyama’s mass, there is a real question of mechanical injury on any fall or throw. We hope the big Bulgarian is undamaged, though it looks like his damaged knee hit hard.

Chiyonokuni defeats Takanoiwa – Takanoiwa must be hurt, as I know he can produce some powerful and effective sumo. But it’s great to see Chiyonokuni back in winning form. He looked confident and aggressive today, and kachi-koshi is still within reach.

Onosho defeats Takarafuji – Onosho continues to impress, do not be surprised if he wins yet another special prize for his excellent sumo this tournament. I suspect he will take the “Young Rikishi Punching Bag” slot from Takakeisho for Aki. Victory seemed to come in the form of Takarafuji slipping and falling, but a win is a win.

Tochiozan defeats Chiyotairyu – Tochiozan has quietly been putting up some solid sumo for a few basho now. I expect him back in the joi for Aki given his kachi-koshi, and we shall see how genki he is feeling then. Chiyotairyu is also likely to finish with a winning record, and a modest move up the banzuke for the fall.

Ichinojo defeats Ikioi – Another marathon battle from the JNS Ichinojo, and the crowd was eating it up. Much respect to Ikioi for going the distance on this one.

Tochinoshin defeats Hokutofuji – Brillant session of mawashi combat today, and both rikishi looked very good. It’s always a tough road when someone decides to challenge Tochinoshin in a strength contest. Possibly san’yaku slot for the mighty Georgian if he can pick up a couple additional wins.

Takakeisho defeats Kotoshogiku – Takakeisho very effectively countered the Kyushu Bulldozer’s front attack. Takakeisho took a pounding this basho, but there is and remains a reason he achieved Maegashira 1 ranking. Talk in sumo circles is questioning if Kotoshogiku will retire on his 8th loss and imminent demotion from san’yaku.

Yoshikaze defeats Shodai – Shodai earns his make-koshi, and will have a chance to improve his tachiai for Aki. Shodai’s fundamental mechanics are sound, but some of his execution requires upgrades before he can compete at the next stage of his evolution. Yoshikaze was in control of this match from the start.

Tamawashi defeats Takayasu – After a good opening gambit by Takayasu, Tamawashi rallied and took the match. The deciding fact was Tamawashi’s ability to block Takayasu landing an effective mawashi grip. Well played Takayasu!

Goeido defeats Ura – Solid Ozeki performance from Goeido, damn I am happy to see him booted up in 2.0 mode for multiple days in a row. Ura is a bit banged up from his prior days with the Ozeki / Yokozuna corps, and was looking vague and stiff. Goeido needs to push hard for his kachi-koshi, it would be ugly to have kadoban twins for Aki again.

Harumafuji defeats Chiyoshoma – A solid and decisive win for Harumafuji, he is now safely in kachi-koshi territory. Each basho he seems a bit more injured, and I really want him to be an active Yokozuna for a while longer. But it’s clear the cumulative damage to his joints are taking their toll.

Mitakeumi defeats Hakuho – Zensho is no longer an option, the shin Sekiwake stops The Boss’s winning streak at 25. This is still Hakuho’s yusho in all likelihood, but Mitakeumi scored an important victory that puts his possible Ozeki campaign into an active mode. He needs two more wins to kick it off. If Iksumo’s forecast is correct, Ikioi and Chiyoshoma seem to be the likely donors.

Haru Day 7 Recap


Testicle-blow-by

Better Late Than Never!

There were few surprises in today’s action, but there was a massive amount of great sumo. We continue to see the lower San’yaku out-perform their historical averages, and this is led by Takayasu really dominating every match. This is, without a doubt, the best I have seen Takayasu perform ever, and he has been a strong contender for over a year. Pleasant surprises continue with Kotoshogiku, who seems to have survived the Sekiwake “hell” week with a winning score, and the possibility or racking up 10 wins. While in general I would encourage him to retire and move on to his new career of being a coach, it would be outstanding if his last act as a sekitori were to regain his Ozeki title.

Also in Ozeki land, Terunofuji – the real Terunofuji – has been gracing the dohyo once more after a long and miserable absence. If you have recently started to follow sumo, his performance this basho is more in line with the kind of sumo that made him Ozeki, and once made him actually feared.

Highlight Matches

Takakeisho defeats Ura – Takakeisho was in charge the whole time, even though Ura twice attempted his space-time defying back bend. Ura fans, like myself, need to keep in mind that there will be an adjustment period where he figures out Makuuchi. My only desire for him this basho is Kachi-koshi. Ura’s apology to the shimpan for the spontaneous lap dance was nice – the guy is total class.

Sadanoumi defeats Kyokushuho – Huge effort from both rikishi, this battle was a strength contest that played out across the dohyo of an extended period. Great effort from Kyokushuho in spot of his hurt knee.

Ishiura defeats Nishikigi – Nishikigi is totally hapless these days, and I kind of feel sorry for him. Today’s bout with Ishiura was no exception, where the two grappled to a stalemate, then Ishirua unleashed an improvised move that turned into a rare kimarite: shitatehineri. Or as I would call it an under arm tea-bagging.

Tochinoshin defeats Myogiryu – via a dirty henka

Okinoumi defeats Tochiozan – Tochiozan is no longer undefeated, and Okinoumi made it look easy.

Endo defeats Chiyoshoma – Outstanding technicals on this bout. Every time I think Endo has lost his mojo, he has a day like today where he does some really nice “if you are watching closely” stuff and stumps his opponent.

Hokutofuji defeats Arawashi – Hokutofuji went yotsu-zumō today, and it worked really well. Arawashi had a good chance at a throw, bout could not close the deal. As a college Yokozuna, I hope that Hokutofuji will employ mawashi fighting more now that he is in the top division.

Chiyonokuni defeats Yoshikaze – This lasted only a second, and Chiyonokuni won via hikiotoshi, or if you watch it the kimarite was really the “testicle-blow-by technique” deftly employed by Chiyonokuni. I would not be surprised to find out later that Chiyonokuni broke wind as Yoshikaze went sailing past his nethers. Strange and wonderful sumo indeed.

Kotoshogiku defeats Shohozan – Shohozan repeated Mitakeumi’s mistke: Hey, lets go chest to chest with the human bulldozer! Once again, having done the hard work for him, Shohozan was out backwards over the tawara before he could react.

Takayasu defeats Sokokurai – Winning technique should have been “Tachiai so strong that it loosened three fillings”. Not sure what kind of magic Takayasu is using, but he is ripe for a Henka in the coming week. That Tachiai is brutal and strong.

Terunofuji defeats Takekaze – Or should read, Terunofuji picks up 330 pound Takekaze like a bale of hay and removes him from the dohyo. If Terunofuji gets tired of sumo he can seek gainful employment as a piece of heavy machinery.

Kisenosato defeats Mitakeumi – Of course he does. Can anyone stop the great pumpkin now? He is so in his grove and his sumo is exactly what he wants every time. Everyone who thought he was not Yokozuna worthy can now get to the back of the line.

Harumafuji defeats Shodai – This bout made me very happy. Not because I don’t love me some Shodai, but Harumafuji looked more like his own self for the first time this basho. Word to Shodai, you are always too high on the tachiai. I know you are trying to protect your face, but it’s how you lose in the first moment of battle. You have to decide if you want to stay pretty or be good. Keep in mind, Yoshikaze was once a very handsome man.

Osaka’s Crowded San’Yaku Picture


crowded-banzuke

Ranking Puzzle For March Tournament

The January basho is not yet done, but already the next sumo tournament, held in Osaka in March, is likely to cause a parade of headaches for the Sumo Association’s banzuke team. Based on wins and losses, sumo wrestlers are demoted or promoted for the subsequent tournament.

In prior bashos, the ranks of Sekiwake and Komusubi have been killing fields, with the rikishi promoted to these ranks consistently being abused and leaving with loss heavy maki-koshi records. This would clear them out, and over-performing Maegashira 2/3/4 sekitori would move up for their turn being destroyed.

Hatsu 2017 is turning out quite differently, and quite possibly the number of qualified rikishi for the San’Yaku ranks (Sekiwake and Komusubi) could be overflowing. Lets take a look

  • Kotoshogiku – if he loses one more bout, he is demoted to Sekiwake. He can re-claim Ozeki with 10 wins in the next basho
  • Tamawashi – Currently Sekiwake, and 6-5, he stands a fair chance at a winning record. He would retain Sekiwake
  • Takayasu – Currently Komusubi, and already with a 8-3 winning record, he would typically be Sekiwake in March
  • Shodai – Currently Sekiwake, he will likely have a record good enough to retain Sekiwake or at minimum demotion to Komusubi.
  • Mitakeumi – Currently Maegashira 1, and blowing the doors off of everyone (8-3). Normally he would be elevated to Sekiwake.
  • Ikioi – Currently Maegashira 3, he will likely have a strong winning record. In past tournaments, this would be enough to promote him to Komusubi or even Sekiwake.

So, that gives us 4 to 5 eligible for Sekiwake, and maybe 2 eligible 3 for Komusubi. Traditionally there are 2 of each, but the Sumo association can mint as many as they want. The March banzuke may be a fun collector’s item.

More Thoughts On Day 11


thegreatpumpkin

Good Sumo, Leaderboard Unchanged

There was a lot of great sumo action during day 11, and in the and of the day the basho is still waiting for Kisenosato to choke. Most sumo fans (myself included) hope and pray every time he steps in the ring that this time, he will stand fast and carry the day. But history teaches not to hold much hope until about 20 minutes after day 15 is done.

Incredibly enough, Ichinojo is still part of the pack in second place – tied with Hakuho. To underscore the bizzaro nature of Hatsu this year, we are now up to starting day 12, and the yusho race is still pretty much wide open. His opponent day 11 was the battered Osunaarashi, who had Ichinojo hand him his losing record and demotion today. Ichinojo is fighting pretty well now, after a somewhat lethargic start. If he can continue this intensity through a few more tournaments, he will be a real force.

Likewise Sokokurai, also tied for second place with Hakuho, delivered a fantastic bout against Takakeisho, who if fighting better than his 4-7 record would indicate. This is the big big news coming out of Hatsu – there seems to be a real power and skill surge in the lower and middle ranks of Makuuchi, and it is in sharp contrast to the weakness that is plaguing the Ozeki and Yokozuna ranks.

Another example, that blistering battle between Hokutofuji and Chiyotairyu. Chiyotairyu really needs to bring some new tactics to his sumo. It seemed the only thing he wants to try is pulling and slapping down his opponents. Hokutofuji, on the other hand, was damn impressive. He showed outstanding balance and ring sense under Chiyotairyu’s attack. Hokutofuji took his time and waited for an opening, then attacked. Both of these rikishi are college competitors, but Hokutofuji has been outstanding this basho.

But there was more, Takanoiwa (also tied with Hakuho for 2nd place) won a raging battle with Chiyoshoma. They bout covered the dohyo, with both men trying to throw each other repeatedly. Fantastic sumo from both.

Mitakeumi fever is gripping the Kokugikan, each day there seems to be a larger phalanx of Mitakeumi fans, all of them cheering their hearts out for him. Today Takekaze threw all of his tricks into the bout, and Mitakeumi did not fall for any of the side step or slap down attempts. Mitakeumi just kept pushing the attack, and moving forward. Mitakeumi earned his kachi-koshi today, so it’s time to see how many wins he can rack up.

Takayasu also hit kachi-koshi today in his win over Shodai, which was quite a one sided match. It’s now time to see if he can get to 10 or 11 wins and start another Ozeki campaign.

But the big match was Kisenosato vs Endo. I know most fans thought the Dump Truck got into trouble, and maybe he did. But I watch that match in awe of that win. Endo had the moves and mechanics to beat him, but when it came time for Endo to close the deal he could not. There was just too much Kisenosato to move. At time Kisenosato shows almost perfect defensive form, and it’s a thing of beauty. It’s kind of amazing to watch him lower his center of gravity to make himself immobile and yet remain highly combative. Props to Endo for having the mechanics, but not the leverage to move Kise.

Hatsu Leader Board

LeaderKisenosato
Hunt Group – Hakuho, Takanoiwa, Sokokurai, Ichinojo
Chasers – Goeido, Takayasu, Mitakeumi, Hokutofuji

4 Matches Remain

Hatsu Day 11 Preview


day-11

The Final Act Begins

The front ⅔ of Hatsu basho is complete. Now we enter the final act where heros are crowned and dreams get crushed.

Everyone is thinking it, but no one wants to say it. Kisenosato stands a good chance of winning this one, but he is expected to find a way to choke out and fumble what may be his best chance ever to finally claim a tournament championship. The most spectacular form this could take would be to lose to Hakuho sometime in the next few days, creating a tie (possibly a multi-way tie) for the lead. Nearly every sumo fan world wide would love to see that happen almost as much as they would feel satisfied that Kisenosato finally won a yusho. Hey, if it can happen for the Chicago Cubs, it can happen for Kisenosato.

Meanwhile today is the day that Kotoshogiku can get his make-koshi and finally end all of the drama around his perpetual kadoban status. I really enjoy watching Kotoshogiku fight, but if Ozeki is not a standard, it’s just a meaningless fancy name. There is big talk about him mounting a campaign in March for a 10 win return to Ozeki, but I am going to assume that he takes retirement with honor and dignity. All of that hinges on Kakuryu actually being up to the task of beating him. Which is far from certain.

Notable Matches

Osunaarashi vs Ichinojo – broken and battered Osunaarashi likely to get his make-koshi today at the hands of the giant Mongolian. I dearly hope he immediately withdraws from the tournament and checks into a hospital or physical therapy center to get repaired. He has top-flight rikishi spirit in a broken down body.

Hokutofuji vs Chiyotairyu – I am expecting Hokutofuji to get his kachi-koshi today. Hokutofuji is looking very solid this basho, and I hope it’s the way he will be from here on out.

Takekaze vs Mitakeumi – Oh yes, this could be a fun fun bout. You have fired up youngster Mitakeumi against henka champ and all around unpredictable Takekaze. Definitely one to watch

Takayasu vs Shodai – Takayasu is on a mission to get 10 wins or more. Doing so will likely re-start his Ozeki campaign, which is his total focus. Shodai needs to learn to overcome Takayasu’s sumo, which I think is fairly tough to do given that he has the stamina of a bull elephant. One shame with Takayasu and Kiseonsato being from the same stable is that we never get to see them fight. I would bet that Takayasu takes a fair share of their in-house matches.

Ikioi vs Goeido – Winner gets his kachi-koshi. Ikioi seems to have a driving hunger this basho that he was previously not able to transmit to action. Goeido seems to be back in his grove, and will be tough to beat. This is also a really good match to watch.

Kisenosato vs Endo – This could be the match that brings the Kisenosato train to a sputtering close. Endo is just the guy to do it, too.

Kakuryu vs Kotoshogiku – Kakuryu is in trouble, a Yokozuna being 5-5 at this stage means he is probably hurt again, which is a terrible shame because I really like the fierce one from Kyushu.