The Asanoyama Affair — Commentary

The big ‘ole caveat: There is no news in this post that has not been mentioned before, I don’t think. This is just Andy expressing his views, and his views alone. There are a few points that I want to make out of this Asanoyama drama, especially as similar scandals have ensnared Ryuden and Abi.

Covid Compliance Questions

First, I wanted to address the Covid restrictions themselves. It would be a difficult, stressful life for groups of young men to be restricted to barracks for more than a year while Japan has tried to stanch the spreading infection. We’ve seen several scandals over the year that hint at the many stressors. My personal opinion is that this is the tip of the iceberg and I would not be surprised if more outings are uncovered but we need a better description of compliance before we can make any judgements. Understandably, it would be difficult to monitor the comings-and-goings of sekitori, especially popular rikishi who have TV appearances and events to go to, even during the pandemic. So it would also not be surprising if news of some outings are handled quietly and do not make the papers.

However, the Kyokai has had one fatality directly due to Covid. Ryuden’s closeness with Shobushi made revelations of his violations a bit difficult to reconcile. But the organization itself understandably has to take a very tough line, though I would not be surprised if, individually, many more oyakata and rikishi do not understand what the big deal is. Maybe the impression, mentally, is that Shobushi was unlucky. So many other wrestlers have gotten it and recovered. I hear that refrain a lot here, too. But the stories that will make it to the press will be those that are not only repeated but involve something extra, like affairs (Ryuden, Tokitsukaze), or hostess clubs (Abi, Asanoyama). The latter of which were focused on early on in the pandemic as accelerating the spread.

The lies, though. C’mon, guys. You know that will make it worse. That said, there’s been some discussion online that Asanoyama is effectively a scapegoat, sacrificed to protect those who continue to break restrictions. I say that without a serious discussion and thorough understanding of what compliance looks like in meetings with sponsors, it is inappropriate to make really wild accusations that the Kyokai is complicit in pardoning non-compliant behavior.

We know wrestlers appear on TV shows. We know wrestlers visit their former high schools and colleges. Goods are being donated to stables. I imagine commercials are being filmed and various visits to stables and to sponsors are made. These can be done in a compliant fashion. However, making friends with a reporter, going out 15-times to a hostess club*, and then conspiring to lie and actually destroying evidence (chat records) to cover up the meetings…<sarcasm>would likely not be compliant behavior</sarcasm>. So until the line is clearly drawn in the discussion, it’s certainly not appropriate to say non-compliance is rife and EVERY meeting is non-compliant.

There are also varying shades of “non-compliance.” In the rail-regulation world, we speak of inspector’s discretion. If something is non-compliant, in many cases they are trusted to use their judgement to determine whether the non-compliance is worthy of a defect (citation) or a more serious violation. Some things are automatic, though. Speeding in the railroading world is handled much more strictly than on the highways. I’m not sure if you all are aware of the Amagasaki train accident, but that illustrates the dangers of overspeed on rail. So, even without an accident, your certification — and your job — is on the line if you’re caught speeding.

But let me ask, back in the automobile world, have you ever sped while driving? Over 12mph over the speed limit? No? Around here, that’s where enforcement starts. Park illegally? Wear a mask in a way that didn’t cover your nose? Well, if you ever did anything not in strict compliance, do not worry, you’re not automatically guilty of more serious crimes like robbery or murder. (This is my #1 frustration with those silly “Lock them up” chants I hear in political rallies on both sides. Even if an action is not only non-compliant but an outright crime, jail time is often not automatic. Due process is a very good thing.) Back in the sumo world, the Kyokai knows their policy and procedures. They conduct investigations and learn the facts. While it would not surprise me if there have been more, it’s rather wild to accuse the Kyokai of complicity without a thorough understanding and description of compliance and without clear, specific allegations.

The Reporter Friend

Second, the unusual extra detail of the Asanoyama scandal is the way it impacts a newspaper, Sponichi. He went to the hostess club, multiple times, with a reporter. When found out by another publication, Asanoyama and the reporter conspired to lie and destroy incriminating chat histories. The ethical violations are serious so the paper fired the reporter, salary reductions to his supervisor, managing director, and the CEO, the paper apologizes to sumo fans and the Kyokai, is conducting more training and being more rigorous about compliance…including the creation of a code of conduct.

While we can hope the relationship between the reporter and Asanoyama had been a friendly, though professionally inappropriate one, the paper sure thought the implications were serious enough to pull no punches. Hopefully, the adoption of more rigorous standards will be good for the paper in the long run. Let’s face it, serious, objective journalism is important and needs to be held to a high standard. Sports news papers and the weekly publications that have been central to this tale are not held in the regard of Nikkei or Asahi Shimbun but they do provide more coverage of sumo than what we get from most formal news sources. Improved standards of “gossip” papers, or broader (non-scandal) coverage in elite papers is better for us fans.

Reluctant Opportunities

Third, is this punishment unduly harsh on low-ranking wrestlers? I am going to take the contrarian view on this and say no. The sumo world is rather full of these mis-matches. It’s an open competition where a new recruit may have serious university experience and still get pitted against Shonanzakura to start their career. Abi clinched the yusho in a match against Dewanoryu, who picked up his first Osumo win against Shonanzakura after losing to Nihonyanagi in his first ever bout. Enho gets no consideration for his mass disadvantage in nearly every bout.

That said, I’m confident that the Kyokai seriously considers who they schedule and will generally pit contenders against contenders. The guys Shonanzakura will face, for example, usually do not finish the basho with winning records — often they don’t finish with more than 2 or 3 wins. However, when Terunofuji was in Jonokuchi, most of his competitors finished 6-1, or 5-2, and the same with Abi in makushita. When Asanoyama is in Sandanme, he will be in the winners’ bracket facing the guys who are in contention for the yusho. I find the chance to be a great opportunity for the guys who do get chosen, not as an unfair punishment.

Not Brothels but Not Crochet Clubs, Either

*Lastly, I do think I need to shift any perception on the internet of hostess clubs as being brothels. They’re not. I’ve had the same perception in the past, before I actually met a some hostesses and former hostesses and went to hostess clubs. The first time I met a former hostess, I was actually talking to my best friend. We were chatting about nightlife in Japan and she opened up to me that she actually worked as a hostess for a week. A friend took her to her club for a week and she made enough money by sitting and talking to guys.

A few of my hostess friends tried to convince me to give hosting a try. I know a few hosts, too, but let’s face it, I’ve never been a night-owl. Anyway, they would take me out with them to their clubs in Roppongi. The atmosphere in those places actually reminded me of this restaurant back home where about half-a-dozen guys in their 50s would come have breakfast and coffee, basically because there was a charismatic waitress who worked there. When she got married, had a baby, and quit, the restaurant struggled to stay open and closed shortly afterwards. I know it was a TV show but I doubt Norm went to Cheers for the beer. It’s sure not why, pre-pandemic, I would hang out at Quadrant in downtown DC.

Once I actually went to one by accident. My wife and her mom still laugh at the “Pabbu Incident.” I was going to meet one of my wife’s friends and I saw a Jazz パッブ. My wife loves Jazz music so I thought I’d check it out and if it was any good, I’d bring her back. When I went in, they had a stage at the front with a piano. Then there were a series of tables with booths facing the stage. It kind of reminded me of a place where Sinatra or Sammy Davis Jr. would have been on stage and guys in tuxes and women in long dresses would be sitting drinking martinis or fancy cocktails. But it was early, so I was there, alone.

The hostess sat me down at a big booth at the back…and then she sat down with me. Then, another woman came in and sat down on the other side…both dressed very elegantly and both sporting big smiles. One asked me what I wanted to drink. I don’t remember what I asked for but when she scurried off and the other woman stayed behind and started asking me “small talk” questions, it clicked. The woman who met me at the door and brought me to my seat wasn’t the hostess. She was a hostess. The other hostess came back with my drink and both stayed with me in the booth. We chatted, I finished my drink, and left to go meet up with Yoshiko.

Later, when I got back to my mother-in-law’s place, I asked her and my wife…”So, um… What’s a Pabbu?” Then I told them about my evening and they both cracked up. “I thought ‘Pabbu’ just meant, ‘Pub,” I said. Other Pabbu may not provide such individualized attention I received at the Jazz Pabbu but I’ve not gone back to find out. However, if I were single and bored, sure. It’s not like a ソープ or something. While the “red-light” reputation is a bit overblown, they are not good places to frequent during a pandemic and have been highlighted by the government as hotspots that lead to the spread of the virus. When we think of the Kyokai’s Covid restrictions, even with the new face-shields these places are not going to be compliant.

Anyway, feel free to disagree with me on any points below. I’m interested in starting a conversation here and seeing what y’all have to say.

Yobidashi Takuro Out

List of Yobidashi 10-26-2019

As Herouth reported yesterday, despite the Compliance Committee’s recommendation of a two tournament ban, Takuro insisted on resigning. He was the Tate-Yobidashi, or the highest ranking of the dohyo support crew. Thus ends the career of likely the most recognizable face among the sport’s yobidashi. The Sumo Kyokai website has removed his name and now Jiro (次郎) stands as the top one, rather than the next one. Click the link for the full list.

Takuro was accused and admitted to striking two subordinates. He struck the first for eating breakfast in the section of seating reserved for patrons, and then snapped at the other for not reprimanding the first. Herouth has a full write-up here.

President Trump’s Senshuraku Visit

File Photo

As senshuraku approaches and the yusho race heats up, I wanted to take a minute to summarize what we know (and some speculation) about President Trump’s scheduled visit to Japan. The purpose of the visit is to be the first foreign leader to meet with the popular new Emperor, Naruhito. Along with the aircraft carrier visit, a golf outing, and dinner at a robatayaki restaurant, the trip will include a chance to watch sumo at Kokugikan and award a new trophy to the makuuchi yusho winner.

Already, there is one positive thing to come from this trip. Despite having studied Japanese in college, lived and worked in Tokyo, visited numerous times since I moved back to the States, and having married a Japanese woman…I had never heard of robatayaki until an hour ago. Apparently it’s grilled on skewers, like yakitori, but it’s usually seafood and veggies. My wife really likes scallops done in this way. How am I just now learning of this? Bruce, did you know of this? I’ve eaten shirako, fugu, bonjiri and basashi for Christ’s sake. I thought my palate was rather sophisticated with my fondness for yuzu and preference for anago over unagi. I guess not. I’m going to need to hit up a robatayaki joint next time or else I’ll only feel worthy of KFC…or maybe Skylark.

Back to the President’s trip, my wife also offered an interesting justification for the golfing trip, one that is apparently common sense among Japanese executives but not mentioned much in the American press. She says her former bosses, executives at a Japanese chemical company, used to golf the next day after traveling back to Japan from the US to help deal with jetlag. Something about being out in the sun helped them recover quickly from the time change. My shusshin is Pinehurst, NC and have played and worked on some of the country’s best golf courses. But I’ve never heard of this rationale. I will be making some marketing suggestions next time I’m home.

The visit comes at an important time with a number of policy issues; the failure of the TPP is firmly in the rear view mirror but there’s a hot trade war with China and the threat of new tit-for-tat trade tariffs with Japan itself, over cars and agriculture, as well as the usual diplomatic tensions with North Korea. However, according to Time magazine, this is a “policy free” trip…which means our posts get to be policy-free (and humor-filled) posts! This is a friendly networking visit and an exciting chance to have the US offer a prize to the yusho winner.

We know the Emperor, and his father, are sumo fans. Naruhito’s daughter was also a big fan of sumo when she was growing up. They stepped back a bit in light of various scandals but the sport still draws the imperial presence. So, as the two parties hope to signal their strong ties and the importance of the alliance in the Pacific, it makes a lot of sense that they would take in some sumo. They are currently scheduled to watch the final three bouts and then present an official trophy to the yusho winner. Trump is a noted teetotaler, so I doubt there will be any drunken antics like when the mayor of Nagoya awarded Harumafuji his trophy back in 2016.

The Japanese press has indicated American stable master Musashigawa (former Yokozuna Musashimaru, uncle of Musashikuni, oyakata of Wakaichiro) will be on hand to assist with translation and answer questions, offer explanations of the sport. I do not know the President’s knowledge level of the sport – or Prime Minister Abe’s – but it would be awesome to sit and watch with a former Yokozuna. If it were me, he would be asked a bunch of silly questions, such as, “what do the four colors of the tassels mean?” However, if Trump is a more seasoned, knowledgeable fan, it would be fascinating to just sit back and listen to them discuss the finer points of yotsu grips and kimarite.

Foreign dignitaries have visited Kokugikan before. Above are some pictures of Prince Charles and Princess Diana. Their son, William, is also a fan. As we can see, though, they sat in the box. There is speculation, and some consternation, about why Trump will be seated ringside but I believe the VIP box will be full and Hakkaku will have a lot on his plate entertaining his own guests. He’ll probably be quite happy passing off some duties to Musashigawa oyakata.

The President and Prime Minister will be seated by the dohyo. This will likely be on the 正 side, facing the gyoji, so a bit off camera (below the bottom of the screen) for that main shot we’re all used to from NHK and AbemaTV coverage. I’m sure the camera between bouts will cut to some of the commotion but I’m not entirely convinced the guests will show up in time for the last three bouts. It may be the DC traffic, but it’s been my experience that things with VIPs seem to run quite a bit behind schedule sometimes, especially after a round of golf. I swear, I’ve been behind some five hour rounds of golf before and it is torture. My bet is, they’ll show up, still in spikes, just in time to hand Kakuryu his trophy.

Naruto Beya Rikishi Abused by Stablemate

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Somebody, please set the “Days without a Sumo Scandal” sign back to zero.

According to several news sources, a case of abuse involving Naruto Beya has been filed with the NSK. The case, dating back to September 2018, involves several instances of an older Sandanme level rikishi using a judo chokehold on an underaged junior stablemate, to the point of losing consciousness. The reported cause for this abuse was the failure of the younger rikishi to perform his stable duties. there are also reports that this same young rikishi was struck with the corner of a smartphone.

For those of you familiar with the Naruto Beya, you will know that its Oyakata is the former Ozeki Kotooshu. Was informed of the situation by the victim on January 13th, and prevented the Sandanme rikishi from participating in the Hatsu Basho before informing the NSK of what had happened.

The NSK’s board of directors will be convening in a special meeting on February 8th to determine what punishment Naruto Oyakata and others involved will face. For more information please see the following link.