Natsu Senshuraku Comments

Natsu-Macaron

With the final day in the books, we have already covered some of the big news of the day. But before we can consider Natsu complete, there are a few other topics to bring up.

Special Prizes

There was a flurry of special prizes awarded today, in fact more of them than I can remember in recent tournaments.

Shukun-Sho (Outstanding Performance) went to Shohozan, for being the only rikishi to beat the yusho winner, Kakuryu. The prize was dependant on Kakuryu winning the final match. In his sansho interview, you actually get to see Shohozan smile! Nah, it’s still moderately scary.

Kanto-Sho (Fighting Spirit) went off in cluster-bomb fashion to: Tochinoshin, Chiyonokuni and Kyokutaisei. Tochinoshin because he was some kind of European winning machine, Chiyonokuni because he seems to have finally found his sumo at his higher weight, and Kyokutaisei because he went double digits in his first top division basho, and he was a movie star.

Gino-Sho (Technique) went to Tochinoshin, as it seems the NSK want to load him up with sansho before his Ozeki promotion, as a way of saying “Nice work you big bear!”.

Notable Matches

There were also a handful of matches that were worth note

Ishiura executed some actually solid sumo against Juryo visitor Kyokushuho for a win. That win may have saved him from relegation back to the farm division, and we may get to see him occupy the Nishikigi memorial “last slot on the banzuke” position for Nagoya.

Speaking of Nishikigi, he went double digits and handed Asanoyama his make-koshi. For a man who has struggled much the last couple of years, I was impressed to see Nishikigi that genki. I just worry he may get over-promoted.

Takakeisho sounded the call heralding Nagoya’s tadpole march, by racking his 10th win of the basho against Sadanoumi. Takakeisho closed out the basho with 8 continuous wins, after having a very rough start that made his fans worry that he was not going to get his sumo back after going kyujo in Osaka. Never fear, he’s back and he’s ready now it seems. Nagoya will see ur-Tadpole Onosho rejoin the crew, and it’s tadpole sumo once again. Frankly, I can’t wait.

Chiyonokuni put Kagayaki away by controlling the form and pace of the match. With Chiyonokuni hitting 12 wins, he’s going to get a huge promotion for Nagoya, and I am going to guess he is going to suffer much like Natsu of 2017 where he was promoted to the joi, and it took him months to recover. Kagayaki will escape a disastrous promotion velocity and have time to patiently continue to incrementally improve. This guy is going to be a big deal if he can stay healthy.

Yoshikaze got a first hand look at Abi-zumo, and shrugged. Abi was all over the place, doing all kinds of things that don’t normally work in sumo. He’s up on his toes, he’s leaning far forward, and his balance is shifting moment to moment. But hey, it got him 7 wins in the joi, and a kinboshi. But honestly the veterans are starting to deconstruct his attacks, and he’s going to be bottled up soon enough. Hopefully he learns some new tricks, because I think he has a lot of potential.

Tamawashi really needed the win he grabbed over Shodai, he scoped by into kachi-koshi territory, and will likely be back in san’yaku for Nagoya. If he can keep his injuries under control, he will have a chance to dislodge the likes of Ichinojo from his transitional Sekiwake rank.

With Natsu done, all of the rikishi have about 60 days to train, seek treatment for injuries, fly off to Europe to see family or just generally carry on with sumo functions. Big events will come next week, as we are expecting to see at least a handful of retirement announcements, announcements of shin-Sekitori coming from Makushita into Juryo, and the announcement of a new Ozeki in the world of sumo. I will write more later about Tochinoshin, as there is much to examine.

But for now, thanks for reading Tachiai, we have had a great time covering the Natsu basho, and we hope you have enjoyed our site.

2018 Haru Special Prizes Announced

Kaisei

With the 2018 Haru Basho set to wrap up in a few short hours, the sansho selection committee has convened and announced the recipients of the special prizes this March.

Following another impressive showing this Basho, Tochinoshin has received his second consecutive Shuken-sho for Outstanding performance. Fellow Gaijin rikishi Kaisei will take home the fighting spirit Kanto-sho for his remarkable tournament, that saw him go undefeated until Day 9. Kaisei’s Day 15 opponent, Ikioi, will also receive the Kanto-sho if he can defeat the Brazillian tomorrow.

Finally, Endo, who with 9 wins coming into Senshuraku looks poised to join the San’yaku for the first time in his career come May, is the recipient of the Gino-sho technique prize.

Update: With his loss today, Ikioi has failed to qualify for his Kanto-sho special prize.

Hatsu Special Prizes Awarded

With Senshuraku underway in Tokyo, the Special Prize Selection Committee has announced the recipients of sansho prizes for the 2018 Hatsu Basho. Tochinoshin has been granted two awards for his tremendous performance this Basho and will receive the Shukun-sho Outstanding performance prize and the Gino-sho Technique prize. A Kanto-sho fighting spirit prize will go to Ryuden for winning ten matches in his Makuuchi debut. Ryuden was also in the running for a Gino-sho, but he did not gain enough votes from the committee to qualify. Fellow top division newcomer Abi will also receive the Kanto-sho if he can win his Day 15 match against Shohozan and finish with a 10-5 record.

Congratulations to all the Sansho winners!

Update: With a win over Shohozan, Abi has earned the Kanto-sho prize!