Haru Day 2 Preview

It’s great to have sumo back. I am a bit surprised at how many of the COVID Kyujo rikishi showed up with a thick, scaly layer or ring rust. I think the most oxidized of all is none other than Yokozuna Hakuho, who may wish to take a quick trip to Yokosuka and use the barncile blaster to remove some of the accumulation. I was a bit surprised that Terunofuji looked a bit rusty as well. By all accounts, he have been a training machine, grinding away in the world famous Isegahama sweat lodge dohyo. I can’t help but wonder if the goal that lays just before him provides more distraction now at the final step than motivation. Please know, mighty Kaiju, most of the sumo world wants to see you succeed. Who do you think has the biggest layer or ring rust? Leave your vote in the comments below.

What We Are Watching Day 2

Kaisei vs Akua – Their only prior match was in November, and it went to Akua. After a 5-10 record at Hatsu, I am sure Akua would like to kachi-koshi his way back to the top division, while Kaisei has a thick layer of COVID-kyujo ring rust to remove.

Daiamami vs Hidenoumi – These two have a 13 match history that is at 7-6, so they are evenly matched with no clear advantages. In all of their prior fights, it has ended via yori-kiri. So chest to chest at the start, and may the man with the best footwork win.

Kotoeko vs Yutakayama – Yutakayama’s bulk is a challenge for Kotoeko, who wants to work with strength and speed. Yutakayama will need to focus on “his brand” of sumo. Namely keeping his mobility focused, his steps small and his balance precise in order to present the fewest opportunities to Kotoeko.

Tsurugisho vs Chiyoshoma – Tsurugisho took and odd fall at the end of his day 1 match with Yutakayama, so I am going to be looking to see if that bad knee is bothering him once more. I think that Chiyoshoma may deliver something more henka like today.

Akiseyama vs Terutsuyoshi – I would think that Terutsuyoshi would have a lot of advantages to exploit. He is smaller and more agile by a good measure. With so much of Akiseyama front-loaded, all Terutsuyoshi needs to do is get to the side to create an opening. Their career record of 3-3 gives us yet another evenly balanced match for day 2.

Aoiyama vs Kotoshoho – Kotoshoho suffered a brutal 2-13 in January, dropping him from Maegashira 3 to 11. I had hoped he would show up at Haru looking better, and with some semblance of good sumo. If day 1 was any indication, this is going to be another tough tournament for him. He has beaten Aoiyama once before, in November.

Midorifuji vs Chiyotairyu – First time match, and I am looking for Midorifuji to put the man with the cannon-ball tachiai on the clay by the 3rd step. Chiyotairyu has not yet been on the receiving end of a Midorifuji katasukashi, but he has to know that it’s coming.

Ryuden vs Hoshoryu – Part of me really wants to see Ryuden deliver a henka today, and put Hoshoryu well and truly in the dog-house with his uncle. This is a first time match between the two, and I hope that Hoshoryu will be a bit more cautious today.

Kotonowaka vs Chiyonokuni – Chiyonokuni, in spite of his day 1 win against Tobizaru, did not seem satisfied. Sure, he got some solid thrusts and hits in, but for a rikishi like Chiyonokuni, he shows up every day looking for a big, energetic brawl. Will Kotonowaka join Chiyonokuni in a good-natured mosh?

Tobizaru vs Kagayaki – Tobizaru was completely out or sorts on day 1, and I hope he can collect his sumo and come back strong on day 2 against Kagayaki. Kagayaki’s dark mawashi still has me a bit unsettled, but even if he is in goth mode, hopefully he retains good sumo fundamentals. He has a 2-0 advantage over Tobizaru.

Tamawashi vs Tochinoshin – 34 match history, with Tochinoshin holding a 22-12 advantage. If Tochinoshin’s knees can handle the strain, he may be able to give Tamawashi an 0-2 start. I think it will all come down to Tochinoshin’s left hand outside grip.

Ichinojo vs Okinoumi – Big, heavy Ichinojo is a challenge for Okinoumi, who is at a 2-4 career disadvantage. If he can shut down Ichinojo’s throwing attempts, he can probably contain the big Mongolian, and will have a chance to score his second win for March.

Kiribayama vs Endo – Endo has a bad first day, and I expect he is going to be a lot more focused, a lot more conservative and he is going to stick to powerful straight ahead sumo today. He won the only prior match against Kiribayama, and has a huge edge in skill and experience.

Myogiryu vs Shimanoumi – Shimanoumi is a late bloomer, who at 31 is finally looking sharp. If he can take his second career win today against Myogiryu, I will start to hope that he may have a good basho.

Meisei vs Mitakeumi – Meisei may have a tough time today, as the mass-reduced Mitakeumi seems to be a real contender. His match against Shodai was quite sloppy, but Mitakeumi showed a lot of power, and a lot of flexibility. Meisei has almost matched his highest rank ever, and is at the point in his sumo career where we may see a step change up in capability. Here’s to hoping.

Terunofuji vs Wakatakakage – Kaiju vs lead Onami brother as we get into the big end of day 2. The only time Wakatakakage has won against Terunofuji was a year ago on day 6 during the “silent basho”. We have come a long way since then, as has Terunofuji. I think that Wakatakakage may have some work to do to shake off the ring rust after being forced to sit January out.

Hokutofuji vs Takanosho – I know I kid the Hokutofuji fans a lot about this man delivering “The most powerful make-koshi in all of sumo”, and I think Hokutofuji is due for a good basho. If this March is the time for him to advance, he may show that to us today against Takanosho, who has taken up a durable role in the San’yaku.

Shodai vs Onosho – If Onosho wants to see his first win, he will need to overcome Shodai’s defensive style. But he must keep his balance well behind his toes, or face an abrupt and surprising turn of fortune should Shodai unleash some of his brand of sumo (aka Cartoon Sumo). Shodai, as long as he is not secretly hurt, is going to have some great matches this tournament, I expect. I hope he saves them for week 2.

Takakeisho vs Daieisho – On his way to the yusho, Daieisho slapped down Takakeisho on day 2. Shall we have a re-run and see if anything has changed? I predict that Daieisho may have some mental challenges this March, but his sumo looks as strong as ever.

Takayasu vs Asanoyama – Every sumo fan I know is looking for a step change in Asanoyama. Some indication that he may be evolving toward the next higher level of sumo. It’s a difficult step to make, and most Ozeki do not. He has an even 1-1 score against Takayasu head to head, so I am looking for a big, burly battle today.

Hakuho vs Takarafuji – A fantastic opportunity for The Boss to knock off some ring rust over Takarafuji. While Takarafuji will try to deflect, defend and extend, Hakuho has a knack (15-2) for grabbing this guy and inducting him into the Space Force with a sub orbital flight.

One thought on “Haru Day 2 Preview

  1. Kotoshoho wouldn’t be the first joi casualty. Where’d Nishikigi go? I hope Kotoshoho doesn’t tumble as far as some others.

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