Ex-Kisenosato To Become Nishonoseki-oyakata; Nishonoseki-beya To Become Hanaregoma-Beya

Name changes and Heya moving

Over on Twitter, Herouth brought us some interesting news of a name change, and a stable moving.

With the looming retirement of Nishinoseki-oyakata, the kabu name and titular head of Nishinoseki-ichimon would become available. There are two The Japan Sumo Association has approved transfer of the name to former Kisenosato. The stable itself will become Hanaregoma-beya, and be run by former Sekiwake Tamanoshima (obviously now known as Hanaregoma-oyakata).

Hanaregoma-beya is under construction in the Adachi section of Tokyo, which borders Saitama. Current Nishonoseki is in Chiba, pretty close to the Tokyo border. For those who think of Narita airport when they think of Chiba, the current stable is about half as far from central Tokyo.

However, as we can see from the map, Adachi will not be that much closer to the hub of the sumo world at Kokugikan, than the current lodgings in Funabashi. But there are several stables in the surrounding area. Tamanoi and Sakaigawa-beya are there in Adachi now, and Oitekaze is very close — just over the border in Saitama.

If the reopening stays on track with more opportunities for degeiko, the move also brings the future Hanaregoma beya closer to fellow Nishonoseki ichimon stables of Minato (Ichinojo) and Tokiwayama (Takakeisho & Takanosho), while moving further from Sadogatake (think Koto-) and Onomatsu (Onosho).

Moron Club That Is Facebook Flags Tachiai For Indecency / Nudity

As the humans all hide from the Corona Virus, the algorithms are running the internet. This morning while checking on Tachiai’s Facebook page, I was alerted that we were in violation of Facebook’s community standards for nudity and indecency. The offense? It seems to he…

Kisenosato.

Now granted, toward the end of his career, he did get quite flabby, and his chest did get a bit wobbly. But come on you dopey algorithm (I refuse to call such nonsense AI), these are sumo wrestlers.

So if Facebook readers no longer see our posts, it’s because some stupid computer program is not happy with Kisenosato.

Asanoyama Keiko With Araiso-oyakata

As Herouth noted yesterday, Asanoyama was not exactly thrilled to receive an invitation to join Tagonoura-beya for degeiko (出稽古) or keiko outside of one’s own heya. Perhaps the risk of kawaigari with the former yokozuna was a bit less scary than the idea of kawaigari with the current dai-yokozuna, so Asanoyama did make the trip.

Welcome to Tagonoura-beya!

I digress, but for those going to Tokyo or in Tokyo, Asanoyama’s stable, Takasago, is in a great location for a visit. I LOVE THIS PLACE. I could just walk around these areas for days. Oh, wait, I actually do that whenever I’m there. It is a bit of a hike from Ryogoku station, between Ryogoku and Kinshicho of the Sobu Line and the Asakusa Line’s Honjo-Azumabashi station. Ryogoku is the station that is home to Kokugikan. Honjo-Azumabashi is in between Sky Tree (Oshiage) and Asakusa (home of the Kaminarimon Gate). Honjo-Azumabashi is on the side of the river with the big unchi, otherwise known as the headquarters of Asahi beer.

Maybe Asanoyama went with the longer trip?

So in his case it may have made more sense for Asanoyama and his entourage to go from Kinshicho, and take the Sobu line up to Koiwa…or get someone to drive them. I favor the idea of a bunch of sumo wrestlers on the train, especially if Asanoyama wanted to delay his punishment.

At least Araiso seems to have had fun, judging by the maniacal laughter while Asanoyama lies, defeated, on the dohyo behind him. The former Yokozuna took 16 of their 17 bouts. While Takayasu was available, the opposing sekiwake opted for butsukari with Asanoyama rather than doing any bouts. This worries me because if Takayasu isn’t ready for keiko bouts against a sekiwake — a week before the honbasho — he won’t be ready to win 10 of 15 real bouts against 1) a pair of Yokozuna with something to prove, 2) two desperate ozeki hoping to maintain their status, and, 3) a half-dozen up-and-comers gunning for his place.