Haru Day 10 Highlights

Ichinojo Once Again Shows Us How To Deal With A Bad Pony

What a fantastic close to Haru’s act 2. Exiting act 2, the yusho race solidifies, and it seems that Hakuho will be the man to beat to take the cup. We also have a vast swath of devastation in upper Maegashira, and the churn between the top and the middle ranks will be impressive for May. Many capable rikishi are headed for make-koshi, some of them could see double digit losses. The Yokozuna and Ozeki are all kachi-koshi save Tochinoshin, who will probably struggle well into act 3 to clear kadoban.

Headed into act 3, we will see matches with an increasing banzuke gap, as the schedulers work to sort the winners from the losers, and try some rikishi likely due for a big move (up or down) out in something closer to their new slots. Will fans get to see Kotoshogiku face Toyonoshima? Many of us are hoping we do.

Tomorrow (day 11) will see Tachiai’s “man in foreign lands”, Josh, return to the EDION arena for another day of sumo. Looking at the Torikumi, it’s a full day of action, including lower division yusho battles featuring many of our “ones to watch”.

Highlight Matches

Chiyomaru defeats Daishoho – Chiyomaru, visiting from Juryo and wearing his “Safety Green” mawashi overpowers Daishoho to move one win away from kachi-koshi. Chiyomaru has a lot of fans around the world and on Tachiai, and his return to the top division will be welcome.

Chiyoshoma defeats Tomokaze – Chiyoshoma’s superior mobility was the deciding factor. Chiyoshoma fought quite a bit of this match in reverse, but his agility made it work.

Kagayaki defeats Terutsuyoshi – Terutsuyoshi’s opening gambit was blown by multiple mattas, and as a result he had nothing to bring to the tachiai. Terutsuyoshi is now make-koshi and at risk of returning to Juryo.

Meisei defeats Yutakayama – This match was carried by Meisei’s superior speed and mobility. The match unfolded at a blinding pace, and the injured Yutakayama could not react quickly enough to counter Meisei’s attacks.

Toyonoshima defeats Yago – Toyonoshima won the tachiai, and never gave up the initiative, maintaining an inside position that forced Yago to react to Toyonoshima’s sumo.

Yoshikaze defeats Ikioi – Yoshikaze turns a ripe 37, and picks up a win against Ikioi, who is a little more injured each day. Already with 9 losses at Maegashira 9, could this mainstay of the top division be headed to Juryo?

Asanoyama defeats Ishiura – Ishiura had this one for a win, but could not maintain his grip on Asanoyama. I have to compliment Ishiura for an inventive and effective offensive plan, and Asanoyama for having the strength and mobility to escape it.

Aoiyama defeats Shohozan – Shohozan never gets close enough to really start landing blows on the Bulgarian man-mountain. Aoiyama employs his overwhelming strength to toss Shohozan around, and then off of the dohyo. Aoiyama remains 1 win behind Hakuho.

Abi defeats Sadanoumi – Abi finally gets another win, and does it with Abi-zumo. It looks like Sadanoumi did not get the memo…

Kotoshogiku defeats Onosho – Kotoshogiku is kachi-koshi, and Onosho is still struggling for balance nearly every day. Kotoshogiku’s 8th win, coupled with the obliteration in the top Maegashira ranks, signal a possible big move higher for May.

Shodai defeats Nishikigi – Shodai got his first win, and actually used good sumo to get there. The look of relief on his face at the end of the match gave everyone a happy feeling inside. Go ahead and watch that part… It’s like when they rescue a puppy who fell down a well.

Myogiryu defeats Kaisei – Its hard to know if Kaisei is injured or completely demoralized, but his sumo has gone sour, and the speed and power of Myogiryu made quick work of him today.

Mitakeumi defeats Endo – Mitakeumi is only at about 80% right now, but he managed to piece together a win against Endo. Endo’s opening move, a left arm bar pull, was premature, and opened him to Mitakeumi’s attack. When you watch this match, note how Mitakeumi holds ground at the center of the dohyo, and it’s Endo who is moving around. This is a solid strategy for someone with a bad knee.

Daieisho defeats Hokutofuji – Both men are flailing franticly, and the whole mess is going nowhere. But as is his custom, Hokutofuji obliges by sloppy footwork and poor balance, and Daieisho seizes his chance to slap down the Komusubi.

Goeido defeats Tochinoshin – Excellent yotsu-zumo from Goeido today, and he takes the risk of going chest to chest with Tochinoshin, and wins. Did anyone else wince as Goeido rolled Tochinoshin left, forcing him to pivot on that bad knee during the throw? Goeido gets his 8th win for a kachi-koshi in Osaka.

Ichinojo defeats Takayasu – Takayasu brought the shoulder blast back for his day 10 match with the Boulder, and he paid for it. It was worth a try, but Ichinojo in his Boulder form is too solid, too massive and too strong to be pushed around by Takayasu. The two go chest to chest, and Takayasu has an excellent grip. But he miscalculates in trying to raise Ichinojo, and instead brings his center of gravity too high. Ichinojo expertly reads the situation, and swings the Ozeki around and thrusts him down. Quality sumo, excellent execution and a well deserved with for Ichinojo, who persists in the 1 loss group.

Hakuho defeats Tamawashi – Once again, Hakuho gets his body into a losing position, just to turn it to his advantage in the blink of an eye through sumo that would be tough to believe if it were not recorded to video. I had to watch it a few times just to sort it out myself. Tamawashi manages to get The Boss turned to his side, and is applying force from behind the Yokozuna. But Hakuho’s super-human agility and ring sense kick in, and he pivots as Tamawashi pushes forward, ending up behind Tamawashi. Hakuho faces Takakeisho tomorrow. What kind of unthinkable sumo will come from that?

Takakeisho defeats Kakuryu – This win puts a big bold line under Takakeisho’s bid to become Ozeki. This was a “quality” win. Kakuryu went toe to toe in a oshi-battle with the Tadpole, and finds himself overpowered. Takakeisho gets his 8th win, and will be seeking out at least 2 more to once again claim the credential for promotion.

Haru Day 10 Preview

Time To Make Your Case…

Welcome to the end of act 2! Act 2 was where we sorted the survivors from the damned, and we started to see who was going to contest for the cup. As Josh pointed out in our weekend podcast, the old guard has decided they were going to make a stand, and re-assert their dominance over sumo. The result has been a return to form that we saw at Aki 2018, where the named ranks devastate the upper 3 Maegashira, and the final week is dominated by the greats of sumo blasting each other around the dohyo. From all appearances, everyone remains genki and in increasingly good fighting condition each day right now. It portends a tumultuous and entertaining finish to the tournament.

Haru Leaderboard

Leader: Hakuho
Chasers: Kakuryu, Takayasu, Ichinojo, Aoiyama
Hunt Group: Goeido, Takakeisho, Kotoshogiku

6 Matches Remain

What We Are Watching Day 10

Daishoho vs Chiyomaru – Beloved Chiyomaru returns to the top division in his new “safety” mawashi, which may or may not have been picked up from Akua when he had to return to Makushita. With a 6-3 record, Chiyomaru is just 2 wins away from securing a bid to return to the top division.

Tomokaze vs Chiyoshoma – First time meeting between these two, with Chiyoshoma having a distinct advantage in speed over Tomokaze. It’s been a few matches since we have seen a Chiyoshoma henka, so be ready…

Terutsuyoshi vs Kagayaki – A loss today would give Terutsuyoshi a make-koshi and put him at risk to return to Juryo. Kagayaki has shown that he is effective against a fast rikishi (he beat Ishiura), so Terutsuyoshi has his work cut out for him. We know his sumo is up to the task if he can get a good position at the tachiai.

Ryuden vs Kotoeko – Shin-Ikioi will take on micro-hulk today. Kotoeko had nothing but problems with Meisei’s “speed sumo” on day 9, and we can expect that Ryuden learned from that match. Ryuden is not always known for rapid offense, so it’s likely he will leave an opening for Kotoeko to employ his superior strength to weight ratio with great effect.

Yutakayama vs Meisei – Yutakayama is already close to the Maku-Juryo line, and he is clearly struggling for wins. Normally he would have no problems overcoming Meisei, but in his injured state, there is no telling how this will go.

Toyonoshima vs Yago – Experience vs youth, and both are in dire need of wins. Toyonoshima especially must be worried about his lack of wins headed into the heard of week 2. Toyonoshima looks just a touch too slow right now. Something happened between Hatsu and Haru. Chances are we will never find out what.

Yoshikaze vs Ikioi – Oh come on! Ikioi will put on a brave, limping fight. Yoshikaze will get his his 7th win, and may exit the dohyo with blood on his face (a Yoshikaze specialty).

Asanoyama vs Ishiura – Both have matching 6-3 records, but their 4 prior matches all went to Asanoyama. Frankly, Asanoyama seems to have consolidated his sumo in the last couple of months, and everything seems to be connecting more smoothly. Ishiura is fighting well, and even winning matches without having to resort to cheap moves. This could be a solid match.

Aoiyama vs Shohozan – Oh goodie, I have been waiting for this one. Two sluggers ready to trade heavy fire at medium range. If Shohozan can get close, it’s going to be tough for Aoiyama, who seems to receive less well than he gives.

Sadanoumi vs Abi – I am sure that Sadanoumi knows by now how to shut down Abi-zumo. Will this be the day that Abi decides to try something else?

Chiyotairyu vs Takarafuji – Chiyotairyu put a lot into his day 9 match against Takakeisho, and I think that he might be a bit depleted when he faces off against the highly technical Takarafuji. If Takarafuji can dodge the initial Chiyotairyu gambits, he likely has a win.

Kotoshogiku vs Onosho – Onosho’s balance is still off due to his lengthy recovery from knee surgery, so I am going to suggest that Kotoshogiku has the upper hand. A win today would secure a kachi-koshi for the Kyushu bulldozer.

Tochiozan vs Okinoumi – Another great match for day 10. Both are high stamina, high skill sumo technicians who will put a lot of thought into their day 10 match. We may see some rare sumo today.

Nishikigi vs Shodai – Shodai holds a 3-1 career advantage over sumo’s Cinderella Man. Already into make-koshi land, a win today would hand Nishikigi his maki-koshi, too. Shodai holds a 3-1 career advantage – is day 10 the magic day for Shodai?

Kaisei vs Myogiryu – Speed vs size today, and I am going with speed. Myogiryu has a terrible record for the basho, but his tour through the named ranks is done now, and he has a real chance to exit with a winning record.

Mitakeumi vs Endo – This could also be a fun match. Mitakeumi’s injured knee is keeping him from showing us his “good” sumo, but he is still quite formidable. Their career record is a balanced 3-3.

Daieisho vs Hokutofuji – Hokutofuji seems to be improving into week 2, and I expect he will disrupt and overcome Daieisho’s offense. Hokutofuji will go for an early nodowa courtesy of his “handshake tachiai”.

Tochinoshin vs Goeido – Ozeki fight! If it goes longer than 8 seconds, I would expect Tochinoshin to win. Goeido is going to go for an immediate kill – blasting off the big Georgian from the Osaka dohyo.

Takayasu vs Ichinojo – I am positively giddy about this one. Ichinojo is looking his toughest in a long time, and Takayasu has been tuning up his sumo. Both men are in the chaser group, and the winner will remain 1 behind Hakuho.

Hakuho vs Tamawashi – Tamawashi gets a Hakuho flying lesson. We love you cookie-man, but The Boss is genki and you are today’s practice ballast.

Takakeisho vs Kakuryu – Takakeisho has never beaten Kakuryu, whose sumo is tailor made to disrupt and defeat someone like Takakeisho. A win today by the Sekiwake would put a very bold stroke on his potential Ozeki bid, and give him his kachi-koshi. Great final match for the final day of act 2!

Haru Day 2 Highlights

A Cake Worthy of a Yokozuna

A hearty “Happy Birthday” to perhaps the greatest rikishi ever to mount the dohyo – none other than Yokozuna Hakuho. Now a ripe 34 years old, Hakuho is the man to beat for any tournament he enters. That he can maintain this level of performance in spite of the rigors and injuries of sumo is a fantastic tale of someone who always seems to find a way to overcome. He has been sidelined several times in the past few years, and has had at least 4 medical procedures to keep his body together, but he keeps coming back. Truly one for the history books.

Highlight Matches

Yutakayama defeats Chiyomaru – Visiting from Juryo from the day, former Makuuchi ballast stone Chiyomaru shows off that amazing green mawashi, and gives Yutakayama some fierce competition. But in Chiyomaru style, he runs low on stamina against Yutakayama, who seems up to the challenge of taking that much force repeatedly to the upper body. As Chiyomaru fades out, Yutakayama attacks. Yutakayama gets high marks for surviving Chiyomaru’s initial attack, and staying patient.

Ishiura defeats Terutsuyoshi – These two have a 4 match history, and one would have to imagine that Terutsuyoshi was aware of Ishiura’s tendency to sidestep a tachiai. But for whatever reason, Terutsuyoshi launched strongly into Ishiura’s henka, and had nothing to show for it.

Kotoeko defeats Toyonoshima – Outstanding tachiai from Toyonoshima, but Kotoeko reads it perfectly, and sidesteps at the edge. It might seem like a small thing, but that move from Kotoeko was a thing of beauty.

Kagayaki defeats Yoshikaze – Yoshikaze had the better tachiai, with Kagayaki ending up high, and Yoshikaze having his hands inside. But Mr. Fundamentals kept moving forward, and quickly left Yoshikaze no room to work. It’s tough to see Yoshikaze unable to generate much if any forward pressure. His mechanics are still excellent, but the strength is absent.

Meisei defeats Tomokaze – Great attack power from Tomokaze, but Meisei was simply faster, and was able to grab Tomokaze’s right arm and move to the side. With his opponent no longer in front of him, Tomokaze is in trouble, and Meisei quickly applies force to send him out. Very nice escape move for Meisei, and he made it work.

Ryuden defeats Shohozan – Shohozan decides he is willing to go chest to chest with Ryuden, and in doing so gives up his mobility advantage. Ryuden controlled the match after the first few seconds, and patiently worked to get a winning grip.

Yago defeats Ikioi – And just like that, Ikioi looks broken again. Ikioi got the better position at the tachiai, and was inside Yago’s reach in a blink of an eye, but Yago was able to catch Ikioi off balance and slap him down, which seems to have aggravated Ikioi’s extensive list of injuries, miseries and pains.

Asanoyama defeats Sadanoumi – Even though Sadanoumi clearly had control of the match at the tachiai, he let Asanoyama set up a rather lethargic hatakikomi that evolved over several seconds. Less than amazing sumo from these two today.

Kotoshogiku defeats Takarafuji – Takarafuji moved to bring his arms across his body to block Kotoshogiku’s grip, attempting to thwart the inevitable hug-n-chug deployment. But this is Kotoshogiku’s forte, and he repeatedly broke contact with Takarafuji, attempting to get him to reach out, which he eventually did. Inside got Kotoshogiku, and the Kyushu Bulldozer gets to work. Really nice, low tachiai from Kotoshogiku. I like how he has his eyes fixed on Takarafuji’s center-mass, and lands with maximum force. Now if only he could teach that to Shodai…

Aoiyama defeats Okinoumi – Okinoumi had the upper hand at the start of the match, but failed to keep Aoiyama in front of him. Once Aoiyama got to the side, he wasted no time in getting Okinoumi off balance and moving sideways for the loss.

Onosho defeats Abi – Once again Abi finds his opponent attacking his outstretched elbows from below, disrupting his double arm thrust attack. With Onosho’s freakishly large hands, he breaks Abi’s offense and moves inside, and it only takes a moment for a couple of quick thrusts to Abi’s mawashi to propel him across the tawara.

Chiyotairyu defeats Tochiozan – Tochiozan jumps early for a matta, and it appears to completely disrupt any offensive plans he brought to the dohyo. Chiyotairyu raises him up, then slaps him down.

Ichinojo defeats Shodai – Lethargic tachiai from both, but once you get a Ichinojo on your chest, your options are limited. After a moment of trying to move Ichinojo, Shodai appears to start working on a way to break the Mongolian’s grip, but finds he is surrounded by acres of muscle and flesh. Ichinojo calmly moves forward, and takes the win. Solid sumo for two days from Ichinojo. Let’s hope the “mighty” version is in attendance in Osaka.

Takakeisho defeats Nishikigi – A straightforward “wave action” win for Takakeisho, as Nishikigi really had no counter-strategy ready for Takakeisho’s preferred sumo.

Daieisho defeats Tamawashi – Daieisho surprised Tamawashi at the tachiai, getting inside and starting to thrust against Tamawashi’s neck before he could set up any kind of offense. Tamawashi did rally for a moment, but was unable to keep Daieisho in front of him. With Tamawashi turned to the side, Daieisho pushed him down for the win.

Takayasu defeats Mitakeumi – A fantastic match, with both men putting forth a maximum effort to win. Mitakeumi anticipated and absorbed Takayasu’s shoulder blast, which left the Ozeki in poor position (as it usually does) with Mitakeumi inside and at his chest. Takayasu quickly switches to defense and puts everything towards blocking Mitakeumi’s grip, but his body remains high and he is clearly in poor position. But then the match because an endurance test, and Takayasu has nearly inhuman endurance. Standing on a dohyo applying nearly a quarter ton of force against your opponent seems to be something Takayasu does with ease, and in Mitakeumi’s degraded physical condition, it was all about the Ozeki waiting him out. Running low on stamina, Mitakeumi broke his grip and Takayasu seized his chance and drove forward for the win.

Myogiryu defeats Tochinoshin – Excellent, match winning strategy by Myogiryu. He rushed the tachiai then kept his arms in front of him and close to his body, blocking any chance of Tochinoshin landing his deadly “sky hook” grip. With Tochinoshin’s arms pinned, Myogiryu moves forward and the Ozeki is out of room to counter.

Goeido defeats Hokutofuji – Hokutofuji seems to be a bundle of nerves so far, and has not really been able to deploy his sumo. The matta really blew his rhythm, and against Goeido that’s more or less an instant loss, as the Ozeki is so fast and so strong in the first 5 second of any match that any mistake will equal your loss.

Hakuho defeats Endo – It was a rough win, but The Boss picks up a white star for his birthday. Endo was surprisingly slow at the tachiai, but Endo managed to keep his hips lower, and had good pressure against the Yokozuna. But Hakuho has so many change-up moves, and broke contact with Endo, giving him a face slap and re-engaging on his terms. Endo was never able to mount much of an offense after that, and Hakuho took the win.

Kakuryu defeats Kaisei – No way to say this other than Kakuryu managed to out-power Kaisei, and that’s quite an achievement. His fans are happy to see Kakuryu bounce back from his day 1 loss, and to do so in solid form.

Quick Hatsu Review – Liam Loves Sumo

After a short break, I’m back with a short review of the 2019 Hatsu Basho. In this video, I briefly discuss the biggest ups and downs of the Hatsu Basho, surprises and disappointments, the Banzuke picture for the upcoming Haru Basho, and the big stories coming out of January.

I want to thank Bruce for encouraging me to post this to the front page. I’ve been brainstorming some new videos and content and I’m very excited to try them out.

Stay tuned, more sumo content coming soon!

Hatsu Day 2: Juryo Wrap-Up

Hatsu Basho Banner

It’s Day 2, and here’s another wrap up from Juryo. This time we’ll throw in a couple bonus bouts from the Makushita promotion race, which is already shaping up to be a hot one.

Makushita Bonus Action

Akua defeats Chiyonoo – After his disastrous basho in Fukuoka, Chiyonoo doesn’t look like coming back up any time in the near future. Akua gives him the ol’ push and pull and he’s face flat on the dohyo. Woof. Akua looks the more likely to be back up in Juryo the soonest.

Takanofuji defeats Ryuko – Takanofuji nee Takayoshitoshi wins despite not having a solid grip for most of this match. Ryuko, a former Tachiai One to Watch who was surprisingly tipped by John Gunning as a future Ozeki, has got a left hand grip and gives a couple attempts at an uwatenage, but Takanofuji manoeuvres him close to the bales and crushes him down via yoritaoshi.

Juryo Action

Chiyonoumi defeats Daiseido – Daiseido, having lost already, gets a visit to Juryo on day 2 against Chiyonoumi. After a matta, the Kokonoe man uses Daiseido’s inertia against him, steps to the side and thrusts him down to win by tsukiotoshi. Daiseido now has very little room for error with 13 days to go, if he’s going to make it to the penultimate division. Chiyonoumi now 2-0.

Sokokurai defeats Gagamaru – There’s a combined age of 66 on the dohyo with these two. You know that facebook meme going around right now where you’re meant to post your first profile picture from ten years ago and your most recent? Well if you’re feeling bad about how you’ve aged then bear in mind that Gagamaru is 31. Before this match starts, I notice that cool man Tomozuna is in the shimpan crew, which in fairness is a good distraction from some gnarly shiko. There’s another matta, and then Sokokurai pulls a planetary-orbit altering henka that sends the Georgian to the clay. Both men are now 1-1, and Gagamaru is not massively pleased.

Shimanoumi defeats Kyokushuho – Kyokushuho deploys some strong nodowa attempts in front of his stable master, but can’t find the killer move and as Shimanoumi gets him going backward, he pulls and it’s all over. Shimanoumi checks his balance, stays low, and shoves his man out.

Jokoryu defeats Tsurugisho – Jokoryu beats Tsurugisho with one of those throws that feels like it lasts an entire year. Jokoryu lands his left hand inside after the Tachiai, and then the entire rest of this match is him attempting to unload the throw. It looks like it may backfire but eventually he controls Tsurugisho’s momentum and executes a very satisfying shitatenage.

Tobizaru defeats Takekaze – Takekaze had a bad loss on Day 1 and needs to sort himself out if he isn’t going to suffer a potentially career-ending drop out of the professional ranks. This match is a slap-fest in which the veteran is determined to rough up Tobizaru’s face, much to the chagrin of the younger man’s fans. Takekaze unleashes about 13 slap and pull and poke and scratch attempts before Tobizaru is able to keep the wily elder statesman at arms length in order to set up the push and pull for the slap down. Takekaze is now 0-2, and Tobizaru is now 1-1.

Arawashi defeats Kyokutaisei – It’s not Tobizaru’s fault, but I could get behind his Tokyo banana mawashi if Kyokutaisei was still sporting the Hokkaido melon tinted belt. Arawashi’s sumo has been a mess lately but he executes a pretty solid tsuppari into mawashi grip transition and chaperones Kyokutaisei out. The best lead actor of any recent sumo film puts up a decent fight at the edge but there’s nothing he can do, and that’s the kind of match Kyokutaisei should probably be winning against a sekitori in freefall. Both men are now 1-1. Bring back the melon!

NHK cuts the feed at this point over from the broadcast satellite to NHK G and shows Kisenosato entering the Kokugikan, and the footage kind of looks like there’s going to be an intai announcement. But it turns out they’re just announcing that he takes on Ichinojo later.

Hidenoumi defeats Mitoryu – disappointing from Mitoryu as Hidenoumi tries and fails to get a mawashi grip, but doesn’t really need it to get the Mongolian high and escort him out in fairly short order. Disappointing match, and Mitoryu is getting a little inconsistent at this level. Both of these guys are now 1-1 as well.

Azumaryu defeats Enho – Ura had better hurry up, because here’s more incredible sumo involving Enho, who is turning into the can’t miss rikishi. Azumaryu’s ring demeanour is so much calmer and measured than the more frantic Enho. They take a while to get ready at the tachiai, but eventually this bout gets underway, and Enho gets in low. Azumaryu tries repeatedly to simply push him down, slap him down, as the smaller man buries his head into Azumaryu’s stomach. Eventually Enho tries to get a mawashi grip, but this doesn’t work and it looks like the Mongolian has him off balance. But the little guy recovers, tries a throw and can’t pull it off. Then he tries a sotogake leg trip and can’t pull that off, and Azumaryu now has Enho off balance and throws him to the dirt. Enho gets up with a bloodied face and nothing to show for his efforts but his fans. Both men are now 1-1.

Chiyomaru defeats Akiseyama – It’s the battle of the bulbous! Chiyomaru tries to hit a slap down and then the match looks like it’s turning into a yotsu-battle. The two men lock up in the middle of the dohyo and it’s possible one of them is about to fall asleep when Chiyomaru twists the awkward Kise-beya rikishi around and tosses him down with a tsukiotoshi. Chiyomaru heads to 2-0, with Akiseyama now 0-2.

Wakatakakage defeats Hakuyozan – Dominant performance from Wakatakakage. Hakuyozan gets the better of the tachiai, but once the smaller Arashio-beya man lands his grip, Hakuyozan is totally out of control of the match and Wakatakakage deposits him over the edge. Both of these young starlets are now 1-1 as well.

Toyonoshima defeats Tokushoryu – Here’s a match featuring an awful lot of belly. Toyonoshima puts his to good use as he takes control straight from the tachiai and wins with an insanely straightforward yorikiri. Tokushoryu tries to get his arm around the senior sumo citizen’s head and execute some kind of throw or slap down in desperation, but he’s got nothing. Everybody here is now 1-1 as well.

Aminishiki defeats Tomokaze – Old meets young in a generational battle. Uncle Sumo mounts the dohyo in an attempt to get something from the current division’s yusho holder. Tomokaze has his usual nonplussed expression as the two men get down for the tachiai. You’ll never guess what happens next: pusher-thruster Tomokaze has backwards-moving slap-down specialist Aminishiki going backwards. Aminishiki dances around the ring and hits the hikiotoshi as Tomokaze goes flying. It’s a good lesson for the youngster. It’s increasingly likely in 50 years we’ll still be watching them wheel the bones and bandages of Aminishiki onto the dohyo – he can still win at this level. He, like Tomokaze and just about everyone else, is 1-1.

Ishiura defeats Terutsuyoshi – Here’s the battle of salt vs protein. Terutsuyoshi deploys a sodium explosion that’s impressive even by his lofty standards. Ishiura takes charge of this match though – and it’s interesting to watch him when the opponent is also small – it’s a reminder he can do some great sumo when he goes head on. Despite Terutusyoshi being small, Ishiura does manage to get in a bit lower, grabs the Isegahama man, spin him around and throw him out. There may have been some discussion of a matta, but Ishiura’s already on his way back to the locker room to make a shake, with both men’s records now 1-1.

Daishoho defeats Takanosho – Daishoho and Takanosho are so close to makuuchi they can smell it. After some good old fashioned slapping, the Mongolian locks up Takanosho’s arm and the Chiganoura man simply can’t escape. Daishoho unloads a kotenage and it might not be surprisingly that Takanosho is in bad shape after the rough throw. Takanosho needs the help of multiple yobidashi to dismount the dohyo and this will put his attempt to gain promotion back to the top level in deep trouble. Both of these guys are also now 1-1. Despite a kotenage arm lock throw being notoriously harsh on the receiver’s arm and elbow, it seemed the injury was to his leg/thigh area.