Japan Sumo Association Cancels Spring Jungyo

Word from Japan today that in the wake of the decision to hold Osaka’s Haru Basho with no spectators, the spring jungyo has been canceled. The public relations director, Shibatayama oyakata (the former Onokuni) announced earlier on Thursday that the spring jungyo tour dates would be delayed until next year. While this is a disappointment for fans across Japan, the spread of the corona virus is becoming a fact of daily life. With it come cancelations to public gatherings and ceremonies of all types.

Winter Jungyo: 12/1-12/5

Fuyu Jungyo: First Four Dates

Winter Jungyo began on December 1. As is usual, the winter Jungyo will travel around Kyushu, ending in Okinawa. This Jungyo is not as much of a long, winding tour as has been the case in past. With 11 dates in 10 locations, it is much shorter than the Spring and Summer trips which often span a whole month, hitting around twenty-five tour sites.

The tour kicked off in Nogata with both Yokozuna, as Kakuryu’s back was feeling better. I have had back spasms before to where I can’t move for a couple of days…the cause, in both cases, was picking up my son. The funny thing is, he’s 10 now and weighs virtually nothing. Back then he was a tiny baby, always below the 5th percentile. Moral of the story is, take care of your back. I hope the Yokozuna and Ichinojo are able to recuperate. Sadly, we have a dwindling contingent of banged up (former) Ozeki. The only one to show up for Jungyo has been Takakeisho, and that comes with an asterisk, as Herouth reported. Herouth’s kyujo list grew a few days later with the addition of Kotoshogiku…but Takayasu was back to practicing as his arm is totally fine.

Nogata lies on the outskirts of Kita-Kyushu, the city at the northern tip of Kyushu. Herouth found this amazing video of practice bout between Enho and Shohozan. These two are a very entertaining pair so I hope this rivalry will last several years, though Shohozan has already been in Makuuchi for the better part of the last eight years.

For the next stop, Jungyo crossed the Kanmon Strait back to the main island of Honshu for an event in Shimonoseki, two days later. Perhaps the wrestlers needed an extra day to tour the Higashida Museum Park in Kita-Kyushu? Surely no more sightseeing time as the troupe hopped back down to the southern side of Kumamoto on the 4th and back up to Fukuoka prefecture on the 5th.

Aki 2019 Jungyo report – Day 9

Today’s event was supposed to have been day 10, but of the three events in Shizuoka prefecture, the one at Izu – which was the place where the typhoon made its landfall – has been cancelled. Around noon October 13th, the rikishi finally left Yamanashi prefecture and headed around Mt. Fuji, down to Shizuoka, in big buses. There have been no safety issues for the rikishi and their support staff from the weather.

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Aki 2019 Jungyo report – Day 8

No question about it – today’s local boy is Ryuden

We have a short, goofless report for you today. By this time, Typhoon #19 wraps its rolling arms around the Japanese main island of Honshu, and heavy rain falls on the Tokai and Kanto regions, where the Jungyo takes place.

A Jungyo event has not been canceled because of weather conditions since the Jungyo has gone indoor in the ’90s. And the NSK bravely tries to keep it that way, bringing its caravan of buses to Yamanashi prefecture, where some of the heaviest rains are predicted.

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