Sokokurai Withdraws from 2018 Haru Basho

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Following a very painful looking fall in his Day 11 victory over Okinoumi, veteran rikishi Sokokurai has announced his withdrawal from the 2018 Haru Basho. Ranked at maegashira 15 and with only five wins to his name, Sokokurai will once again find himself in Juryo for the 2018 Natsu Basho. This may be a blessing in disguise for the man from Inner Mongolia, who took home the Yusho last time he was in the second division.

With this development, Sokokurai’s Day 12 opponent Ryuden picks up a much needed 5th win.

Takakeisho Withdraws from 2018 Haru Basho

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Tachiai has learned that Maegashira 3 Takakeisho has withdrawn from the 2018 Haru Basho citing a contusion on his right foot. He has been prescribed three weeks recovery time for his injury. His Day 11 opponent, Kaisei, will pick up a fusen win bringing his overall record to 10-1. Coming out of Day 10 with a 3-7 record, the former Komosubi Takakeisho will undoubtedly drop further down the Banzuke. We at Tachiai hope that Takakeisho heals up and returns with the same vigor that brought him so much success in 2017.

Takayoshitoshi Goes Kyujo Over Violent Incident

Yesterday, on day 8, Takayoshitoshi arrived late, trotting up the hanamichi, as the bout between Yago and Takanoiwa was about to start. He was told off by the head shimpan.


The newly-minted sekitori arrived late because his newly-appointed tsukebito failed to cue him in time.

Sekitori are appointed a tsukebito upon promotion to Juryo. A tsukebito is the sekitori’s manservant. He carries his things and does all menial jobs for him. The duties include prompting the sekitori that it’s time to get to the arena – the sekitori should be there two bouts before his own in case the wrestler on his side loses, requiring him to offer the chikara-mizu to the next one on that side.

Following his late arrival, Takayoshitoshi lost his own bout. In a precarious position already, being at the bottom of the Juryo banzuke with only three wins to his name, he went back down to the shitakubeya (the preparation room), and there proceeded to cuss and beat up his tsukebito. This ended in a swollen face and a cut inside the mouth that caused the tsukebito to spit blood.

This was done in front of many witnesses, and the head of the crisis management department, Kagamiyama oyakata, as well as the head of the board, Hakkaku, were informed immediately. Takayoshitoshi and the tsukebito were called in for questioning, and Takayoshitoshi admitted to 2-3 punches.

It is morning time on Monday in Japan, and Takanohana oyakata has called in a press conference, apologized, and announced that Takayoshitoshi will be kyujo as of today. A special meeting of the board will be convened today to further question the parties involved, and deliberate an appropriate punishment.

Yokozuna Kisenosato Kyujo


The injured Yokozuna declared today that he would not be competing in the Haru basho, due to ongoing complications related to his un-treated left pectoral injury sustained at the end of last year’s Haru basho. Kisenosato previously had declared an ultimatum for himself that he would either compete at a Yokozuna level in the next basho he entered, or he would retire. Given this condition, he was not ever a real candidate for entry.

Fans want to see Kisenosato healthy again, and worry that he is not on a path to recovery given his current level of activity. We wish him the best and urge him to seek out the best sports medicine doctors and trainers to assist his recovery.

Everything You Need to Know After Act Two

Act Two has come to a close, and while Tokyo is freezing over, action at the Ryogoku Kokugikan continues to heat up! The third and final act of the 2018 Hatsu Basho begins tomorrow, and what an act it is shaking up to be. Over the next five days, dreams will come true, aspirations will be crushed, and a new champion will be crowned. The rikishi are ready, the Emperors Cup has been polished and the giant macaroon baked. Without further adieu, here is everything you need to know going into Act Three!

Yusho Race

After ten days of sumo, the Yusho race has boiled down to just one name: Kakuryu. With a spotless 10-0 record coming into Act Two, the Yokozuna is firmly in the driver’s seat this Basho and the Emperors Cup is now his to lose. However, he’s not home free yet, as Maegashira 3 Tochinoshin is just one win behind, and a slip up by Kakuryu will put him back into contention. Kakuryu will begin to face his stiffest competition yet over the next coming days and will have to weather the storm if he wants to hoist the cup come Sunday.

Kachi Koshi and Make Koshi

Despite several rikishi sitting halfway to their kachi koshi after Act One, only three men were able to achieve a winning record during Act Two. Tochinoshin secured his kachi koshi on Day 9 in a herculean effort against Mitakeumi. Daieisho picked his up with a win over Tochiozan on Day 10. While Kakuryu had eight wins by Day 8, he obtained his Yokozuna kachi koshi of ten wins on Day 10. Grandpa Bullfrog Takekaze, Terunofuji, Ikioi and Hokutofuji are the only rikishi entering Act Two with make koshi records, as each only pick up two wins after ten days. Hokutofuji’s make koshi is especially unfortunate as the young rikishi was looking stellar coming into Hatsu and high hopes were surrounding him. Looks like the curse of the NHK special strikes again. As for Terunojuji, he recieved his losing record from the sidelines after missing a week of the Basho due to illness. Everyone else will have their fate decided in Act Three. For an excellent break down of the promotion and demotion implications for March, please see lksumo’s post here.


With Kakuryu firing on all cylinders, there weren’t any kinboshi gold stars handed during the Act Two. Now that Onosho has pulled out, Kakuryu’s projected final opponents will change, giving one more Maegashira a chance to put dirt on the Yokozuna. Endo will likely be the one chosen to square off against the Yokozuna on Day 12.


Act One saw us lose Kisenosato, Hakuho, Terunofuji, and Aminishiki. That list has since shortened, as Aminishiki made his return on Day 10 and Terunofuji will be coming back from kyujo tomorrow. In their place is Onosho, who pulled out on Day 10 due to a ligament injury in his right knee, and will lose his Komusubi spot for the Haru Basho in March.

While the conclusion of this Basho may seem clear, if there is one thing I’ve learned about sumo is that it is very unpredictable. So much can happen over the next five days, and Act Three of the 2018 Hatsu Basho is shaping up to be the best act yet! Raise the curtain, let’s begin!

Onosho Withdraws from Hatsu Basho

The Japanese news has reported that Komusubi Onosho has withdrawn from the 2018 Hatsu basho due to a right knee posterior cruciate ligament injury. While the severity of the injury is undisclosed as of yet, treatments range from simply resting and icing the joint to physiotherapy. Going kyujo with a 4-5 record coming into Day 9, Onosho will receive a demotion back into the Maegashira rank for March. As a result, we will have a new Komusubi for Haru, and with Takakeisho sitting dangerously close to a make koshi, we could potentially have two new faces holding the rank come Hatsu. We at Tachiai hope that the power of the red mawashi will heal Onosho and that he returns even stronger!

Aminishiki Withdraws from Hatsu Basho


Aminishiki defeating Kagayaki at the 2017 Kyushu Basho


Uncle Sumo Aminishiki has withdrawn from the 2018 Hatsu Basho after re-injuring his right knee during his Day 5 bout with Chiyonokuni. Aminishiki was in a great deal of pain following his match and was unable to return to the dohyo to bow or leave for the dressing unassisted. As many readers know, Uncle Sumo’s knees are held together by tape and prayer at this point, so any further damage could potentially be career ending. We at Tachiai hope that this is not the case, and that our beloved Uncle returns to the dohyo soon.

Update: examination shows that he did not re-injure his ligament, but rather had a bone bruising of the tibia, which is painful but not career-ending. A bone bruise usually results in a hematoma. That has been drained out, and on January 22nd (basho day #9) Aminishiki will undergo a second examination. If he does not develop an inflammation, he will attempt to return to the basho (Daily Sports – Herouth).