Nagoya Day 9 Preview

Endo Day 8

Abbreviated preview tonight, as I am recovering from a chanko nabe coma. For those of you following on twitter, it was my best batch ever, and it is only due to my iron constitution that I did not succumb to the overwhelming urge to nap it off.

If we let ourselves think about the leaderboard, and how the yusho race will progress, one handy trick is to consider what record is needed to win the cup. Let’s say its 12-3. If we do that, any rikishi with only 3 losses today could mathematically take home the hardware. When you look at it that way, this race is wide open, and could be one of the most thrilling in a long time. Of course to get to that broad field, wide open barnyard brawl in the final weekend, we need Mitakeumi, Endo and Asanoyama to suffer a few losses. I am sure the scheduling team has matters well in hand.

Nagoya Leaderboard

Leader – Mitakeumi
Chasers – Endo, Asanoyama
HuntersTakayasu, Tochiozan, Chiyotairyu

7 Matches Remain.

What We Are Watching Day 9

Ishiura vs Asanoyama – Are you thinking it? Yes, it’s a perfect time for a henka. Ishiura is 0-3 against Asanoyama, and Ishiura needs the wins.

Tochiozan vs Meisei – this first time meeting features hapless Meisei going up against a man who could conceivably challenge for the cup. I think we know how this is going to end.

Sadanoumi vs Kotoeko – Kotoeko needs to get his sumo in gear if he wants to stay in Makuuchi. I think that even if he gets the punt back to Juryo, he will be a top division mainstay by 2019. The guy is solid, just having a tough time with all of the heavies at the bottom of the banzuke for Nagoya.

Hokutofuji vs Onosho – Onosho has been showing some new dimensions to his sumo the past 3 days, and I think Hokutofuji is in for a few surprises. Onosho holds the advantages of low center of gravity and speed.

Nishikigi vs Daieisho – Both men come in 4-4, and their career record is 4-4. How could the schedulers resist? Who wins? Who cares! This is what sumo is for! (4)

Takarafuji vs Myogiryu – Myogiryu lost a tough set to Endo on day 8, and he would likely want to get back into a winning rhythm, so it’s going to be Takarafuji who gets to try and contain him. Myogiryu leads their career series 10-4

Kyokutaisei vs Chiyotairyu – A loss today and Kyokutaisei is make-koshi. The Hokkaido man is really struggling in Nagoya, and Chiyotairyu is a tough opponent when he’s hot. Sadly for Chiyotairyu he was cold Day 8.

Endo vs Yutakayama – You have to know they are saving the big Endo matches for later in the week. But Yutakayama has been looking fairly genki this tournament. Yutakayama is moving well, and his increased bulk seems to be working for him at long last.

Yoshikaze vs Takakeisho – The battle of ultimate sadness. Whatever plagues Yoshikaze, it’s really grim.

Abi vs Chiyonokuni – a pair of highly mobile oshi-zumo men are squaring off in a match that will be full of action. I am keen to see if Abi tries something new, and how much effort he has to put into chasing Chiyonokuni around.

Ikioi vs Kotoshogiku – Ikioi’s strong attacks up the middle vs Kotoshogiku trying to go chest to chest and bump out the big man from Osaka. Ikioi will need to strike early to keep Kotoshogiku getting a grip.

Shodai vs Shohozan – Color me surprised that Shodai holds a 7-3 career lead over Shohozan. I am going to guess that one or both of these guys are going to be joining the make-koshi ranks very soon. Especially for Shodai, he really needs to regroup, as he is (mentally) rattled at this point. His sumo has become vague and hesitant.

Daishomaru vs Mitakeumi – I am not looking for Daishomaru to hand Mitakeumi his first loss. The guy can smell double digits clearly, and I am sure that’s the next stop on his road through Nagoya. If Mitakeumi hits 10 or above, the talk of the town will be their hopes for him to join the Ozeki ranks. As noted prior to the basho in a post that got many people upset, Mitakeumi is very consistent. Sadly his level of consistency is below what is needed to rise above Sekiwake. But anyone can evolve and improve.

Ichinojo vs Kaisei – In what is possibly the ultimate stress test for the strength of the Nagoya dohyo, a half ton of rikishi will mount the clay and face off in combat. I give the advantage to Kaisei, even though he trails the career series 2-8. Ichinojo is out of sync, out of step and just plain off right now. After a string of excellent tournaments, this is a sad setback.

Tamawashi vs Takayasu – These two used to face off in Sekiwake battles all the time, and Tamawashi had a habit of spanking Takayasu. Takayasu had a good match on day 8 against a new opponent who was probably in awe of the Ozeki. This is not the case with Tamawashi, who is more than capable of giving Takayasu a strong contest.

Goeido vs Kagayaki – unlike the day 8 match that was always going to be strongly favoring Takayasu, Kagayaki might be able to hold his own against Goeido. If Goeido tries to get clever, he could find himself in trouble with Kagayaki’s ability to shift to low and strong. Speed favors Goeido, strength favors Kagayaki. Word to the Ozeki – take him down quickly.

5 thoughts on “Nagoya Day 9 Preview

  1. Worth keeping in mind: in the 15-bout basho era, there have been three 11-4 yusho winners in Makuuchi (most recently Harumafuji :cry: ). There has never been a 10-5 yusho winner in the top division, although they’re quite common in Juryo, where once the tournament was even won with a 9-6 record.

  2. Not saying who won, but Myogiryu did take a spectacular and unfortunate boot to the head as he and Takarafuji were tumbling over the side of the dohyo. Pretty sure it left a mark on his face.

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