Japan To Watch November Basho In 8K

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US Fans Still Left Begging

According to Yahoo News Japan, NHK will try out an eye-popping 8K technology broadcast during the Kyushu tournament from Fukuoka starting November 13th. This will be an advanced technology demonstration of what NHK is calling “8K Super Hi-Vision“.

While no one in Japan has an 8K set, NHK is playing back the tournament in select locations in Tokyo, no word if the Kokugikan will be one of them.

Meanwhile, US fans are getting by with 25 minute highlight shows that NHK is sharing with the world. Don’t get me wrong, these are much better than no sumo at all, but I maintain that NHK is missing a fertile market they could develop in sumo. Like most sumo fans in the US, I eagerly await the day that NHK will allow me to pay money to watch a more complete broadcast.

Hakuho Back In Action

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The 69th Yokozuna, Hakuho, rejoined the Aki Jungyo when the tour got to Kyoto on the 22nd. By all accounts he is still not up to full fighting form, but he intends to compete in the November tournament in Kyushu. Hakuho has clearly lost a good amount of mass, and there seems to be a bit of distress in the Japanese sumo press over his reduction.

Personally, I think there are a handful of Rikishi who might be able to up their performance with even a modest weight loss, and it’s excellent that Hakuho is taking the lead here.

Below a clip from twitter of him training with some of the other Rikishi on tour, looking good and likely for Fukuoka.

 

Banzuke Forecast (Kyushu 2016)

Green Day came through DC last week and I’m gutted that I couldn’t get a ticket. They were playing the 930 club which is a pretty small venue so I’m not surprised. Nevertheless, I was online when the tickets went on sale and somehow they were all gone within seconds. However, the system still let us try for the next two hours. As a result of all of this bitterness, I’m going to rip off one of their song titles and butcher it for my pleasure. Here goes: “Wake Me Up When [October] Ends.”

The banzuke won’t come out for weeks but I wanted to give it a stab. I found it very difficult to make sense of the lower-level maegashira ranks since everyone below M10, save Endo, belongs in Juryo and none of the top-ranked Juryo wrestlers deserve promotion. If others want to try, I think we could try to score our attempts: 2 points if you get the right rank, 1 if you get the right side (E vs. W). I think I’ll score well from Sekiwake up…the rest is likely pretty far off but still fun to try.

 

Rank East West
Y Harumafuji Kakuryu
Y Hakuho
O Goeido Kisenosato
O Kotoshogiku Terunofuji
S Takayasu Okinoumi
K Mitakeumi Aoiyama
1 Tamawashi Tochiozan
2 Kotoyuki Yoshikaze
3 Chiyonokuni Shodai
4 Shohozan Nishikigi
5 Takekaze Kaisei
6 Sadanoumi Endo
7 Takarafuji Chiyoshoma
8 Takanoiwa Tochinoshin
9 Ikioi Myogiryu
10 Kagayaki Kyokushuho
11 Ichinojo Chiyootori
12 Daishomaru Daiki
13 Hidenoumi Sokokurai
14 Gagamaru Amakaze
15 Toyohibiki Chiyotairyu
16 Ishiura

Aki Basho Highlights

On 10/6, the Sumo Kyokai posted highlights from the Aki Basho. I enjoyed watching many of the bouts, especially Takayasu’s win over Harumafuji. Grappling matches can be exciting but these arms-length brawls are fun to watch.

Currently, our favorite rikishi are in the midst of a break in their Fall Jungyo tour. Bruce has written about these tours before. You can see from the videos that it’s more light-hearted PR for the sport. I hope they visit the States sometime. I really want to see one because they seem like a lot of fun, especially for the kids. The tour starts up again on Friday in Aichi-ken. A full schedule for the Jungyo is available on the sumo.or.jp website.