Nagoya Day 9 Preview

The drama playing out in Makuuchi has been covered in glorious detail by lksumo in his story line post, but to round things out, lets look at the leaderboard and the matches for day 9. Everyone’s waiting for word from Tagonoura Oyakata on Takayasu’s disposition. I think the smart money says that he’s in for at least 8, and if he’s any kōhai of Kisenosato, he’s in it to win it. That may be horribly foolish, but given the way sumo works, they will probably encourage him to do it.

A chance at his first yusho is not entirely far-fetched, if he has mechanical use of that left arm. Hakuho is actually beatable by Takayasu right now, in my estimate. I am pretty sure The Boss knows this, too. We should know in the next few hours.

Meanwhile, that dohyo is going to be a bit more hazardous each and every day that ticks by. This is traditional for Nagoya, but it’s tough to watch people slip and slide in so many matches.

Nagoya Leaderboard

Leaders: Kakuryu, Hakuho
Chaser: Takayasu
Hunt Group: Mitakeumi, Myogiryu, Tomokaze, Terutsuyoshi

7 Matches Remain

What We Are Watching Day 9

Kaisei vs Sadanoumi – Come on, Kaisei. You are in no condition to fight. Take your ticket to Juryo and work your way back once you are healthy.

Tochiozan vs Terutsuyoshi – Terutsuyoshi dropped his second match on day 8, but he is only 2 away from a kachi-koshi in the top division (his first ever). He defeated the hapless Tochiozan the last time they met (May).

Kotoyuki vs Nishikigi – This match comes down to Nishikigi being able to get a grip on the mobile and maneuverable Kotoyuki. Nishikigi holds a career lead of 5-2, but I think Kotoyuki is very genki right now.

Enho vs Takagenji – We all want Enho to rally, yes we do! Takagenji has been fighting well, but I think Enho has enough room to submarine in and get to work. This has the potential to be an excellent and exciting match. Enho took their two prior meetings, both in Juryo. -lksumo

Kotoeko vs Yago – Both of these rikishi are struggling heading into the second week. Yago is having undercarriage problems, and Kotoeko is still struggling after a cold start.

Chiyomaru vs Daishoho – For myself, Chiyomaru has exceeded my expectations, and I think this is probably a good rank for him. Of course that brings up the question of a kachi-koshi, and how much trouble he would have at Maegashira 8 or 7 in September.

Kagayaki vs Tomokaze – This has my attention in a big way. I think both are doing well going into the second week, and they are fighting using similar styles. From the 2 prior matches, Tomokaze has won them both via hatakikomi.

Myogiryu vs Toyonoshima – 7 ranks divide these two, but this is not quite the lopsided fight that banzuke rank might indicate. True Myogiryu looks ready to kachi-koshi at Maegashira 7, but Toyonoshima seems to finally have shed his ring rust, and may be on a winning streak. Toyonoshima brings enough experience to match what Myogiryu will have at his disposal, which is what I hope this will be an even match.

Shohozan vs Shimanoumi – Both men will want this to start and probably stay mobile. If Shimanoumi yields the inside track to Shohozan, the match will probably go to “Big Guns” in short order. Slick dohyo alert for this bout.

Chiyotairyu vs Okinoumi – Okinoumi will bring finesse, Chiyotairyu will bring power. I can’t find a way to see which one prevails. I think the slick dohyo may play a role in this match, too.

Kotoshogiku vs Onosho – Did you see a flash of the earlier, genki edition of Onosho on day 8? Will we see that again? I am assuming that Kotoshogiku is back to having knee problems, as his ability to generate forward thrust is bad, and further hampered by the traction problems with the dohyo.

Takarafuji vs Daieisho – Both of these rikishi are struggling right now, and it’s only fair that one of them gets a win from a pairing of these two. I think Daieisho is slightly less worse than Takarafuji right now.

Aoiyama vs Endo – Both of these rikishi are probably hoping they are done touring the upper ranks, and can focus on getting their win count to #8. Both of them need to win 5 of the next 7 to make it there, so this match may be critical. They have yet to face the two Komusubi, but otherwise are out of high-rankers to fight. -lksumo

Asanoyama vs Ryuden – Heaping spoon fulls of excitement over this match. I know that Ryuden tends to prevail in their head-to-head matches (5-3), but Asanoyama’s sumo has made a bit of a step change in the last 6 months. Like the Aoiyama vs Endo match, both of these 3-5 rikishi need to win 5 of their last 7 to reach the safety of 8.

Hokutofuji vs Tamawashi – Word to Hokutofuji, watch for the “arm breaker” hold that bit Takayasu. This will be a high-intensity oshi match, no matter what. But Hokutofuji seems to be operating at “Ludicrous Speed” this tournament.

Mitakeumi vs Abi – This will probably be a pickup for Mitakeumi, as he seems to have the antidote for Abi-zumo at the ready (3-0). Like all of the other 3-5 cohort, Abi needs 5 wins out of the next 7 to reach 8.

Shodai vs Takayasu – If this match happens, this will not be an easy ride for Takayasu. I bust on Shodai pretty hard most days, but if he can survive his dreadful tachiai, he is surprisingly flexible, clever and unpredictable. Takayasu’s best strategy may be speed: dispatch Shodai before he can cook up something unexpected. The career record favors Takayasu 8-5, and the two have met and alternated victories in the last 6 tournaments. -lksumo

Ichinojo vs Hakuho – Hakuho needs to be careful here. I am sure that he will try hard, and possibly succeed, in defeating Ichinojo before the tachiai. The primary threat is that injured arm, and the physics of a 212kg Ichinojo in aggressive motion against an injured man.

Kakuryu vs Meisei – Meisei has very little to offer right now, it seems. He may be over-ranked for this basho, and I think he may have physical problems as well. The main hope for Kakuryu is to not take any odd falls, or pick up any injury, in this first-time meeting.

Nagoya Day 8 Highlights

For those catching up, Ozeki Goeido withdrew from Nagoya the morning of day 8, citing an injury to his right shoulder, and medical guidance to abstain from sumo for a month. While Goeido was not fighting well going into the middle weekend, his kyujo has far-reaching implications to the remainder of the tournament, which we shall detail.

Which leaves Takayasu as the final Ozeki still competing. But during his day 8 match, Takayasu appears to have injured his left elbow in his match with Tamawashi, as Tamawashi used his “arm breaker” hold that has betting so many rikishi in the past. Should Takayasu withdraw as well, we would find ourselves in a “Nozeki” situation for the first time in quite a while.

From Herouth

Who benefits the most from the culling of sumo’s second highest rank? I would say the injured Hakuho, who looked even rougher, more chaotic and maybe even desperate today in his match against Shodai. The lack of San’yaku opponents for the Yokozuna in week 2 means the schedulers will need to reach further down the banzuke for matches, and some mid-Maegashira may find themselves facing the Yokozuna. Hakuho has already had matches with both rikishi in from Maegashira 1-3, and faces Maegashira 4 Ichinojo on day 9. He has both Sekiwake, Takayasu if he stays in, and Kakuryu on the final day. But at some point he will look at his score, feel the twinge in that right arm and decide it’s time to go kyujo. I am sure given the increasing pain he suffers every day on the dohyo, he won’t have any problems finding a doctor to declare him in need of healing.

Highlight Matches

Azumaryu defeats Kotoyuki – Azumaryu, visiting from Juryo, employs a very skillful “not quite a henka” to dodge the tachiai and win over Kotoyuki.

Chiyomaru defeats Enho – Enho gets his submarine tachiai, but discovers that due to Chiyomaru’s enormous belly, there is not much he can do down there. Rather than attempt to grab a hold of Enho, Chiyomaru expertly thrusts him away, time and again. Enho can’t take much of this, and is pushed out for the loss.

Sadanoumi defeats Yago – An early thrusting battle turned into a stiff arm mawashi fight for grip. I am going to assume that Yago’s heavily bandaged knees are the source of some of the problems Yago has maintaining forward pressure. Yago moves to lift Sadanoumi, which only raises him up and leaves him exposed to Sadanoumi’s advance.

Kagayaki defeats Terutsuyoshi – Terutsuyoshi’s tachiai is excellent, and he succeeds in raising Kagayaki up, but he finds it tough to maintain traction, as by day 8 the Nagoya dohyo has started to take on its typical smooth finish. Terutsuyoshi keeps battling forward, but Kagayaki gets a hazuoshi (armpit) attack running that prevents Terutsuyoshi from doing much of anything, save a throw attempt that Kagayaki disrupts, sending Terutsuyoshi to the clay. Watch your footing out there, gentlemen.

Nishikigi defeats Kaisei – Kaisei has nothing to offer in terms of sumo right now. I think he should just take his lumps and work on recovery.

Kotoeko defeats Tochiozan – Kotoeko maintains his oshi-focus at Tochiozan’s center mass, and does not let the veteran distract him. Solid sumo from Kotoeko, who dropped 4 in a row.

Toyonoshima defeats Takagenji – I loved this match. Takagenji’s youth and vigor against Toyonoshima’s quiet strength and experience. I know that he’s executed that sukuinage thousands of time in daily practice, and once he set it up there was nothing Takagenji could do but enjoy the ride.

Myogiryu defeats Daishoho – Daishoho attempted a bit of a side step, but Myogiryu adjusted and took a hold of the Mongol and advanced for a yorikiri.

Chiyotairyu defeats Shohozan – When we previewed this match, we knew it had potential, but it went a bit odd when Shohozan tried a dramatic hopping shift to his right at the tachiai. Chiyotairyu adjusted an tried to tackle Shohozan, who caught him and now the two are chest to chest. Shohozan tried to lift and twist to set up a throw, but Chiyotairyu advanced and drove Shohozan from the ring. I enjoyed the surprises this match delivered.

Shimanoumi defeats Okinoumi – Tons of traction problems today with Okinoumi’s protected left foot sliding out from under him to enable that loss. Have to love that Nagoya dohyo.

Tomokaze defeats Kotoshogiku – I feel a bit down about a match like this. Kotoshogiku still has the speed and the skill, but is no longer strong enough to bulldoze guys like Tomokaze. In my somewhat faulty brain, as soon as he gets his arms around an opponent, I expect Kotoshogiku to just motor them off the edge. But Tomokaze is more than up to the task of shutting down the former Ozeki.

Onosho defeats Takarafuji – I am going to start being hopeful that Onosho has gotten a bit of his balance back. He certainly looked more like his former self today, completely overpowering Takarafuji.

Asanoyama defeats Endo – Beautiful sumo from Asanoyama today. That fluid “rack and roll” into the uwatenage really reminded me of Kisenosato, and brought a smile to my face.

Hokutofuji defeats Aoiyama – Not sure what they are feeding Hokutofuji right now, but please keep doing it. Aoiyama gets turned around straight from the tachiai, and Hokutofuji escorts him out. The mighty Konosuke (gyoji) barely gets out of the way as over 700 pounds of combatants come rumbling through.

Abi defeats Ryuden – We got to see some well executed Abi-zumo today, but that ending was a bit of a puzzler. Ryuden lunged to his left (where Abi was not) and stumbles out of the ring. The kimarite was listed as hikiotoshi, but I am going to assume that poor traction once again played a part in this match.

Mitakeumi defeats Ichinojo – A matta revealed that Ichinojo intended a henka against Mitakeumi, which would have been bloody glorious. But when the match finally got underway, Ichinojo struggled to contain Mitakeumi who had gotten inside at the tachiai. Once The Boulder knew the jig was up, he released pressure and stepped out.

Takayasu defeats Tamawashi – As mentioned earlier, Takayasu sustained at least a minor injury to his left elbow thanks to Tamawashi’s “arm breaker” hold that has caught many others in its painful trap. Following to elbow tweak, you can see Takayasu become enraged and just go on the attack with his one good arm.

Kakuryu defeats Daieisho – Smooth and efficient win for the Yokozuna. He is delivering the best sumo of the basho each day, and I think he is the favorite for the yusho.

Hakuho defeats Shodai – This was a running gun battle of a match, and a complete chaotic mess. While Hakuho won, it showed few marks typical of his Yokozuna sumo. For the second day in a row he ends up laying on his opponent. Shodai executed at least two really solid escapes, leaving Hakuho to try pulling him down, which worked. That expression following the win, and that glance at his right elbow tell you everything you need to know here.

Nagoya Day 8 Preview

It’s the middle day of the glorious Nagoya tournament, and NHK World Japan will be live for the final 50 minutes of Makuuchi across their global streaming platform. Sadly I don’t think we will get to hear John Gunning, who was doing commentary with Ross Mihara for day 7, but the NHK Grand Sumo crew always do a fantastic job. If everything goes well, both Yokozuna could make kachi-koshi today, as they are unbeaten going into day 8.

Also with day 8’s preview, we take a look at the basho leader board. Act 2 is doing its job remarkably well – shaping the yusho race. There are 4 rikishi in numerical contention, with 3 actually likely to battle it out for the cup. But until someone starts putting dirt on the Yokozuna, it’s theirs to lose.

Nagoya Leaderboard

Leaders: Kakuryu, Hakuho
Chasers: Takayasu, Terutsuyoshi
Hunt Group: Mitakeumi, Ichinojo, Myogiryu, Tomokaze, Enho, Kotoyuki

8 Matches Remain

What We Are Watching Day 8

Kotoyuki vs Azumaryu – Azumaryu is up from Juryo to fill the Tochinoshin gap, and he draws against a surprisingly genki Kotoyuki who somehow is part of the leaderboard. Ok, fine – Mr 5×5, please take it into week 2. I would love to see you make a case for the cup.

Chiyomaru vs Enho – They don’t come much bigger than Chiyomaru, and they don’t come much smaller than Enho. If you wanted a bout of contrasts, here it is. Enho will need to find a way to get under that enormous belly in order to get to work.

Yago vs Sadanoumi – The series favors Sadanoumi 2-0, and Yago fans are hoping he can win his first today. I don’t have any news on what manner of malady is plaguing Yago, but it has to be something. You don’t go from a decent battler to someone squeezing by without an injury.

Terutsuyoshi vs Kagayaki – Terutsuyoshi would love to hang on to his slot in the chase group, but he has never won against Kagayaki (0-2). Kagayaki suffered a horrible case of ring rust in the first week, but seems to be back on his sumo. This will be a pivotal match.

Kaisei vs Nishikigi – Two sumo nice guys go head to head, but the outcome is fairly certain. I am sad for Kaisei. He’s hurt and not doing well, but he seems intent to solider on.

Kotoeko vs Tochiozan – Tochiozan continues to be a half step behind his normal level of sumo, and that might not be good enough to defeat Kotoeko this time around.

Toyonoshima vs Takagenji – Toyonoshima opened Nagoya losing 5 straight, and has now won the last 2. Did he learn from the prior 2 days matches against Takagenji? Lets see if Toyonoshima goes chest to chest and waits him out.

Myogiryu vs Daishoho – First time meeting between these two, but frankly I expect Myogiryu to put Daishoho without too much trouble.

Chiyotairyu vs Shohozan – Oh good, two heavily armed battle boys here to slug it out. If Shohozan can keep his balance and survive the first 10 seconds, he has a good chance of winning this one.

Okinoumi vs Shimanoumi – Another great first time match between an veteran Makuuchi mainstay who is holding his own this tournament, and a young, hard charging rikishi who seems to have some good upside potential. I give experience a small advantage here.

Kotoshogiku vs Tomokaze – Tomokaze won his first 5, and has dropped the last 2. The main weakness of his opponent today is poor strength from his lower body. If he can overpower Kotoshogiku after the tachiai, the veteran may not have enough strength to slow him down.

Onosho vs Takarafuji – I am looking for Takarafuji, who has excellent mobility, to take full advantages of Onosho’s apparent balance problems. Onosho will be well served to keep Takarafuji in front of me, and to overpower him early and keep moving him back.

Asanoyama vs Endo – Both are going to go yotsu, and it’s going to be fantastic. Endo is the far more versatile rikishi, and I expect that he will set the tone of the match. Asanoyama will try to keep it in his comfort zone, but I expect Endo to try for that shallow / mae-mitzu straight from the tachiai.

Aoiyama vs Hokutofuji – Although Hokutofuji holds a career 7-1 advantage over Aoiyama, I am expecting this to be a real brawl. Hokutofuji is looking more composed and more on point than he has in a long time, but Aoiyama has upped his sumo prior to Nagoya and is showing excellent balance and ring sense.

Abi vs Ryuden – At some point Abi-zumo is going to come roaring back, and this might be the day, as Abi holds a 3-1 career advantage over Ryuden. Ryuden has been leading with his head the past two days, and maybe that might be slowing him down.

Mitakeumi vs Ichinojo – Both are in the hunt group, both are fighting well, and both are my favorite to win this match. Mitakeumi does hold a7-4 career advantage on the Boulder.

Goeido vs Meisei – If Goeido loses to Meisei, he’s really really hurt his ankle. This is like a bait minnow you feed to your bigger, fancy fish. You feel a bit sorry for it, but you know your fish needs to eat.

Tamawashi vs Takayasu – These two used to beat each other senseless occupying the Sekiwake ranks, and their career record is 12-12. If Takayasu is going to contend for the cup, he needs this win.

Kakuryu vs Daieisho – I am expecting a straight-forward win for the Yokozuna.

Shodai vs Hakuho – Given how much I deride Shodai, you would think I am going to make some quip about The Boss catapulting him back to toon town. But this is a very serious, very important match that I think is a must-win for Hakuho. Not only because he wants “yet another yusho”, but I think he may be near the limit of what his body can support for this basho. He needs his 8th win before he starts knocking heads against Takayasu, Mitakeumi and Tamawashi. So he’s got to beat Shodai, and I expect him to use every psych-out and mind game in his considerable arsenal to make sure Shodai defeats himself before the tachiai. Bonus points to Kakuryu if he can give his tachi-moshi one hell of a pep talk today.

Nagoya Day 7 Highlights

I stated up front that I expected Hakuho to take the yusho, and possibly do it with 15 straight wins. I continue to think this is a strong possibility, but if you take the body of his 7 matches thus far in Nagoya, you can see a trend. Firstly, each day he struggles a bit more to win. His sumo is less smooth and efficient, and he is definitely favoring that right arm.

While he may have “rested up” and gotten to the point where he felt like things were good, once he is in full power combat with real opponents, it’s possible that he either re-injured that bicep tear in his right arm, or the strain of daily matches has brought in the biggest long term threat, inflammation. I cite this as a threat because swelling will tear tissue, and create damage that cannot heal.

Right now, The Boss is playing for time. He has a personal goal to make it to next summer to still be an active Yokozuna during the Tokyo 2020 summer olympics, and to continue in sumo until he can secure his Japanese citizenship and transition to an Oyakata. The question now, can his arm hold out that long? If he takes the pattern of one tournament on, one tournament off, he needs to just survive 3 more tournaments to reach his olympics goal. That’s 25 more wins (1+8+8+8) for the winningest man in sumo.

But as an egotist, I could see Hakuho driving himself to the point of muscle failure in that injured arm, simply to maintain the facade of the invisible, unbeatable ultimate dai-Yokozuna. Let’s hope it does not come to that. But his sumo is very rough now, and I fear he will have some big problems with his second week opponents. He can reach the safety of kachi-koshi on Sunday by beating Shodai.

Highlight Matches

Terutsuyoshi defeats Tokushoryu – Terutsuyoshi’s poorly executed henka attempt nearly lost him the match, but he rallied and drove Juryo visitor Tokushoryu out of the ring. That was one fine recovery.

Toyonoshima defeats Sadanoumi – As always, act 2 brings some great reversals, and after having a miserable basho in act 1, perhaps Toyonoshima has found his sumo. Toyonoshima finally looked more like his normal self, as he used his belly to disrupt Sadanoumi’s offense, and closed the match with a painful looking tottari.

Kotoyuki defeats Chiyomaru – Kotoyuki’s superior mobility carried this match, coupled with Chiyomaru’s poorly executed attempt at a pull down.

Kagayaki defeats Enho – Once in a while, Enho’s up and under tachiai misses its mark. This happened today as Kagayaki blocked him out at the initial charge and powerfully tossed his much smaller opponent out of the ring. Enho never had a moment to plant his feet to defend, and Kagayaki’s mobility ensured he was glued to Enho’s retreat.

Yago defeats Tochiozan – Tochiozan owned the tachiai, but for some reason broke contact, probably to try and improve his body / arm position. This left him off temp and Yago battled him for every attempt at a grip. With Tochiozan off balance, Yago was able to slap him down for the win. Fairly sloppy match, but I am sure Yago is happy for the win.

Kotoeko defeats Kaisei – Kaisei had a strong position, but that injured right arm robs him of any chance to generate meaningful offense. Kotoeko’s sukuinage was brilliantly executed, with his left foot as close to out as you could ever get and still win.

Shohozan defeats Takagenji – It seems Shohozan did indeed study that match against Okinoumi, as he applied a variation on the same theme. Although Shohozan’s usual style of sumo is a fairly brutal oshi style, he took Takagenji to his chest, and wore him down. For the second day in a row, this worked.

Okinoumi defeats Nishikigi – Nishikigi works for his normal arm pin, but Okinoumi deftly entraps him instead, pulls him off balance to the right and rolls it into a uwatehineri. When you have veterans like Okinoumi on the dohyo, you can get some really impressive displays of sumo skill.

Onosho defeats Daishoho – Onosho really needed this win. He nearly bounced too far back at the tachiai, but was able to recover and advance with surprising strength and speed. His balance was still to far out in front of his big toe, but today it worked for him.

Chiyotairyu defeats Tomokaze – I am not sure if it was the plan, or Chiyotairyu improvised today, but this was lightning fast and perfectly executed. Tomokaze, to his credit, absorbed most of that cannon ball tachiai, but Chiyotairyu smoothly shifted to his right, and pushed hard. That put Tomokaze off balance and out of control.

Shimanoumi defeats Kotoshogiku – As I mentioned earlier in the week, I was happily enjoying the genki Kotoshogiku, but knew that with his catalog of injuries he was going to struggle later. We can see in this match against Shimanoumi, that the former Ozeki just can’t quite generate much in the way of forward pressure.

Myogiryu defeats Ichinojo – Myogiryu continues his dominance over the Boulder, and for at least today, he distracted Ichinojo by attacking his neck / face. For whatever reason, Ichinojo decided to respond in kind rather than pressing the attack to win, and while Myogiryu received something that looked like the Vulcan Death Grip, his right hand found a deep grip on Ichinojo’s mawashi. Now Ichinojo is high, and has no real grip on Myogiryu. Myogiryu drops his hips, and Ichinojo has no defense. I am sure it hurt, but Myogiryu’s gambit paid off.

Meisei defeats Takarafuji – I think everyone in the Dolphin Arena was relieved for Meisei, who finally scored his first win of the basho. Sadly, journeyman technician Takarafuji only has 2 wins thus far.

Hokutofuji defeats Abi – This is the first time that Hokutofuji was able to score a win against Abi, and I think it happened because Hokutofuji’s tachiai landed deeper than Abi expected, and he was able to shut down Abi’s right hand lead off to his normal thrusting attack. Abi-zumo requires a bit of distance to the opponent, and has Hokutofuji has show before, his lower body is nearly autonomous, able to advance while his upper body absorbs blow after blow.

Ryuden defeats Tamawashi – Tamawashi came out strong, and took the tachiai, forcing Ryuden back. But Tamawashi has a predictable left-right thrusting attack, and Ryuden was able to pivot at the end of Tamawashi’s right arm thrust, leaving no where for his left to go. Now off balance and leaning forward, Ryuden finishes him with a shove to the shoulder. Nice timing on Ryuden’s part.

Mitakeumi defeats Asanoyama – Don’t fret Asanoyama fans. His first trip to the upper reaches of Maegashira was always going to be a rough ride. His sumo is still solid, and it’s still improving. Mitakeumi gave him a close in demo of tadpole sumo, and it worked brilliantly. Robbed of any ability to land a grip, Asanoyama tries to pull, and that release of forward pressure is all any tadpole needs to put you away.

Takayasu defeats Aoiyama – In spite of his 3-4 record, I don’t think Aoiyama has looked this good since two years ago at Nagoya where he took the jun-yusho. If you look at Aoiyama’s foot placement during this match, its quite excellent, and his focus on keeping maximum pressure against Takayasu’s upper body is relentless. But when his attempt to throw Takayasu failed, he was defenseless, and Takayasu moved him out for the win. Good sumo from both. I think that Andy may have been on to something he thought it might be time for Takayasu to contend for the cup.

Endo defeats Goeido – I am calling it now, Goeido’s ankle is acting up again, and we are not going to see good Ozeki sumo out of him for the rest of the tournament. He is going to try to piece together his 8, which he might do, but don’t look for his awesome pure offense sumo on a daily basis. I think Endo was surprised by how easy it was to land a mawashi grip at the tachiai.

Hakuho defeats Daieisho – The Yokozuna looked rough, out of control and trying anything he could short of his favorite throws, all of which count on that right arm. Fans who are not comfortable with the sometimes brutal nature of sumo should be put on notice. Once Monday rolls around, Hakuho will be facing higher ranked opponents, and every one of them are going to work to attack that arm. I am sure The Boss knows it too, and why the day 8 match against Shodai is going to be pivotal.

Kakuryu defeats Shodai – I will say it, Kakuryu looks more genki right now than Hakuho. Shodai gave him a few tricksy moves, but really had no answer to the Yokozuna’s forward advance.