Hatsu Special Prizes Awarded

With Senshuraku underway in Tokyo, the Special Prize Selection Committee has announced the recipients of sansho prizes for the 2018 Hatsu Basho. Tochinoshin has been granted two awards for his tremendous performance this Basho and will receive the Shukun-sho Outstanding performance prize and the Gino-sho Technique prize. A Kanto-sho fighting spirit prize will go to Ryuden for winning ten matches in his Makuuchi debut. Ryuden was also in the running for a Gino-sho, but he did not gain enough votes from the committee to qualify. Fellow top division newcomer Abi will also receive the Kanto-sho if he can win his Day 15 match against Shohozan and finish with a 10-5 record.

Congratulations to all the Sansho winners!

Update: With a win over Shohozan, Abi has earned the Kanto-sho prize!

 

Wakaichiro Loses Final Match

During the morning of Hatsu day 15, Wakaichiro faced his toughest opponent yet, former Sandanme 5 rikishi Kotoseigo. Although he put up a valiant fight, Wakaichiro was pushed out of the ring for a loss. Winning move for Kotoseigo is oshitaoshi.

This brings Wakaichiro’s record for Hatsu to a respectable 5-2, an excellent recovery from the brutal 1-6 record in Kyushu. Some of his other fans across the internet have been trying to speculate if he will return to Sandanme for March, but right now it’s tough to make anything other than a wild guess. Given his first basho in Sandanme, the level of competition there is a clear step higher.

We are certain that whatever the outcome, his fans are rightfully pleased with his progress, and look forward to more sumo by the Texas Sumotori in Osaka.

Hatsu Day 15 Preview

 

Tochinoshin Victorious
Kasugano Heya Welcomes Their Hero

 

We come to it at last, the final day on a thoroughly enjoyable sumo tournament. One of the better ones in the last few months, and a real delight to watch over the past two weeks. Some of my favorite rikishi have been doing poorly, but the overall Makuuchi crew has been competing with skill, vigor, and flashes of brilliance.

While none of the crew here at Tachiai (nor anyone I know of) predicted Tochinoshin would dominate this basho, his performance continues to follow the arc we believe will continue. That starting with Kotoshogiku’s yusho in 2016, the age of the Mongolian stranglehold on sumo is ending. This gives us great hope, as this is not the sumo of 20 years ago. The sport continues to have an ever-increasing international appeal, to the puzzlement of Japan.

For now, let’s enjoy the images and video that will flow from today, and know that we continue to see the glorious evolution of a great and ancient sport.

What We Are Watching Day 15

What, you thought because it’s senshuraku there’s nothing going on? Ha! But it does seem like a few folks were brought up from Juryo to try on their Makuuchi moves in preparation for March in Osaka.

Daiamami vs Aoiyama – For Daiamami to pick up his 8th win, and stay in the top division, he must overcome the man-mountain Aoiyama, and his enormous man-boobs. No easy accomplishment. I beg NHK to not show any slow-motion replays.

Kyokutaisei vs Nishikigi – Another likely Juryo promotee for March, he squares off against Nishikigi who also needs his 8th win. The good news for the man who never gives up, he holds a 6-1 career lead over Kyokutaisei.

Kotoyuki vs Ishiura – Someone call the henka police! Kotoyuki is also looking for #8 against the somewhat inconsistent Ishiura. I am sure that Kotoyuki is ready for Ishiura’s submarine tachiai.

Shohozan vs Abi – I am guessing the winner secures a special prize, both are 9-5, both are fighting well. Abi has had a great debut tournament, and I predict he is going to do great things for the next year or so.

Shodai vs Kagayaki – Shodai looking for win #8, and a small but interesting move higher in the Maegashira ranks for March. Shodai may in fact still be salvageable as a good san’yaku rikishi. Much of it will depend on him fixing some of the mechanical problems he has. His spirit and dedication are first rates. Kagayaki survived a somewhat rocky Hatsu, and comes out with a winning record. I look for him to be mid-Maegashira in Osaka.

Endo vs Tochinoshin – Sure, Tochinoshin has the yusho, and Endo is kachi-koshi, but this one is very interesting to me. Endo was at one time the “Great hope”, but injuries have hampered him. Surgery last year brought him back to some level of health, and he has been working hard to recover as a contender. I am fairly sure Tochinoshin will take this one, but Endo has shown some fantastic sumo this January. Perhaps he has one more surprise left for us.

Chiyotairyu vs Daieisho – Super-sized Chiyotairyu looks for a kachi-koshi and elevation to one of the top 4 slots of the Maegashira ranks for March. Chiyotairyu holds a 5-1 career advantage over Daieisho, and Chiyotairyu recently has been adding a sprinkle of neutron-star matter to his chanko, which has given him a steep gravity well.

Takarafuji vs Kotoshogiku – Ugly Darwin match. Winner kachi / loser make kochi. Not sure who I would rather have win. Takarafuji had a pretty tough card this basho but kept up the fight. But it’s tough to see Kotoshogiku fade away. Either way, Kotoshogiku holds a 12-6 career advantage.

Yoshikaze vs Ikioi – The saddest match of the whole basho, which could only be topped if Aminishiki and Terunofuji battled in wheelchairs with IV bottles hanging on them. Both of these great rikishi are in broken states, and I just hope they face each other on the dohyo, shrug and walk off to find a bar.

Kaisei vs Ichinojo – “Why don’t you go pick on someone your own size?” In response, I present you a battle of the gas giants. Both are kachi-koshi at this point, so this is just to see what happens when two massive objects collide. Hopefully, LIGO is tuned up and running.

Hokutofuji vs Aminishiki – Ok, I give up. Why is this happening?

Takakeisho vs Arawashi – Takakeisho wants a win to keep his banzuke drop as restrained as possible. Arawashi’s knees won’t give him too much support as he tries to resist Takakeisho’s powerful thrusting attack. This is actually the first time the two of these rikishi have faced off.

Mitakeumi vs Takayasu – Current Ozeki vs Future Ozeki. Good match here. If Mitakeumi can keep himself in touch with his sumo, and stay calm and strong, he can take this one from Takayasu. But I predict that Takayasu is going to go for his cannonball tachiai. Maybe Mitakeumi will give him a bit of a Harumafuji mini-henka, and send the fuzzy Ozeki launching into the shimpan gallery.

Kakuryu vs Goeido – Happy to see Goeido booted up in 2.0 mode on day 14. Kakuryu back to injured, so this one is all Goeido, I predict. Big K has no power to ground, possibly due to strain and pain once again in his lower back. I call 10-5 a worthy return, and he should get that back adjusted before it’s chronic again.

Wakaichiro Fights Again Day 15

Wakaichiro Tachiai

The final day of the Hatsu Basho, and Texas Sumotori Wakaichiro returns to the dohyo for his final match of the tournament. Early Sunday, he faces off against Sadogatake rikishi Kotoseigo. Kotoseigo is in fact from the same stable as Kotoshogiku (and a swarm of others). He is 23 years old and is both taller and heavier than Wakaichiro. Kotoseigo reached as high as Sandanme 5 before injury dropped him down the banzuke. A second injury left his sumo career on the rocks, and then a third injury has forced him to more or less start over from the bottom.

So this final match of Hatsu will be against a highly skilled, strong and fast rikishi. It will be a tough test for Wakaichiro, but it will be a great test to see how far his sumo has progressed, and how ready he might be for a possible return to the Sandanme division in March.

As always, we will bring you details of his matches as soon as they are posted.

State of play update: Day 14

This will be a brief one.

The Yusho Race

Tochinoshin won!!! Takayasu will claim the jun-yusho all by himself with a win; if he loses, Kakuryu and Ryuden will have opportunities to join him with victories on senshuraku.

The Sanyaku

With Goeido’s victory today, neither Ozeki will be kadoban in Osaka.

Tamawashi’s loss means three sanyaku slots will be open. The first two belong to Tochinoshin and Ichinojo. Endo is in the lead for the second Komusubi slot, but he faces Tochinoshin tomorrow. Should Endo lose, either Kotoshogiku or Chiyotairyu can claim the slot with a win on senshuraku.

The Promotion/Demotion Line

Dropping to Juryo: Terunofuji and Aminishiki. Taking over their slots: most likely Myogiryu and Hidenoumi. Aoiyama has also done enough for promotion, and Kyokutaisei is either there or close. But there may not be room for all four, as Sokokurai has done almost enough to be safe, and faces what’s left of Terunofuji tomorrow. Also, both Takekaze and Daiamami can reach safety by winning on the final day. Daiamami vs. Aoiyama may be a de facto exchange bout, while Takekaze needs a win against Asanoyama to stay in Makuuchi. Victories today have assured IkioiAsanoyama, and Nishikigi  of top division places in Osaka.