Sumo Fans Worldwide


I wish I spoke more languages. Particularly Japanese, for obvious reasons. (If I use kanji on this site, it’s because I’m trying to practice.) This is the map of visitors to this site. Now, I know this blog isn’t quite as popular as The Huffington Post but I hope it’s more entertaining.

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Poll: Should Terunofuji Withdraw From March Tournament?


Background: Terunofuji withdrew from the January tournament after breaking his collar bone. At the time, he was also hobbled with a knee injury. With only three wins he is kadoban and in danger of demotion to sekiwake if he does not log a winning record in March. The March tournament begins on 3/13. He pulled out of the January tournament on 1/15. Assuming they immobilize his shoulder, resting him and keeping him from aggravating the injury, it takes 6-8 weeks to heal a broken collarbone.

If he withdraws, the implications are clear, he will be demoted to sekiwake for the May tournament. He will then need to register 10 wins in May to secure promotion back to ozeki status. If he cannot do it, he’ll be treated like anyone else, needing 33 wins in three consecutive tournaments (unless you’re Goeido) to get promoted back to ozeki.

I don’t want to influence the voting with my opinion, so click here if you want it: Continue reading

Is Chiyonoumi the Real Deal?


Homarenishiki’s presence in the lower divisions is certainly increasing my own attention to the lower ranks; I don’t know about y’all. Anyway, while looking over the results of the New Year tournamenScreenshot (145)t I noticed that Chiyonoumi won sandanme division. He comes from Kochi which means I automatically pay more attention. Kochi is a great place.

Then, when I looked deeper at his record, he’s had a pretty stellar year in professional sumo with three yusho now, and a steady progression up the banzuke. He won his first two yusho under the name Hamamachi. One of those yusho, in Jonidan, came with Homarenishiki also performing well in the same division. Homarenishiki finished 6-1. They have not fought.  Continue reading

初場所 2016, 15日目: Special Prizes


Shodai’s makuuchi career is off to a great start; 10 wins and a Fighting Spirit award. To provide a bit of a comparison with highly touted debuts: Endo got his first kanto-sho after his third tournament while it took Ikioi almost 2 years to pull it off. Of course Ichinojo’s rise was even quicker as he scored two special prizes and a kinboshi, finishing in second place upon his debut. However, we’ve all seen the ups-and-downs those three have gone through. Continue reading